Can the “Negawatt Box” Help you Out-Screw Your Power Company?

By Travis Johnson, Stock Gumshoe, January 19, 2010

OK, the mighty masses of the Gumshoe faithful have made it very clear: they want to know what the heck a “Negawatt Box” is, and whether we can profit from the company that makes them.

Here’s what the ad says, from Jeff Siegel and the folks at Alternative Energy Speculator:

“Reduce your monthly energy bill by 44%…

“Have the opportunity to double — even triple — your money within the next 12 months…

“And, finally, stick it to your energy company—once and for all.

“FULL DISCLOSURE: We’ve saved thousands using this new device in our office.

“The company that makes this revolutionary energy-saving device currently trades about 50 cents. That changes today.”

The ad goes on to say that this publisher, which if they’re like most of the Agora offspring runs out of a restored mansion in downtown Baltimore, was able to cut their electric bill by 44% in three months, using this “Negawatt Box” that was installed by their friendly neighborhood electrician.

Here’s how they pitch it:

“This past summer, when Joe showed up at our midtown Baltimore office to fix our broken air handler, my colleagues and I paid little attention. We just wanted the AC back on. Frankly, I was getting tired of wiping the sweat off my brow every few minutes.

“Little did I know then that by the time he would leave, we’d have a new energy bill-busting device that would ultimately end up saving my office hundreds — every month.

“And more importantly, we’d have a lead on the tiny publicly-traded company that makes it.

“You see, after doing a bit of digging, I found that this simple “Negawatt Box” isn’t something you can pick up just anywhere. In fact, this thing is completely controlled and distributed by a single company. And there’s ZERO competition.

“Now here’s the best part…

“Thanks to Congressional bill H.R 6, the U.S. Government is going to pay up to $2,000 to households and businesses just to try out this new ‘negawatt’ technology.

“But wait, it gets even better…

“Every time the government ponies up $2,000 to try this technology, the company makes $6,600!”

So what are we talking about here?

Well, they do go on to make clear that yes, “Negawatt” technology is just conservation — and some of the teasing in the letter seems to be more broadly about this general move to conserve energy as the “fifth fuel.” This is pretty widely accepted, there is still a lot of fairly low hanging fruit in energy efficiency, and investments in efficiency are likely to do more for the environment (and your electric bill) in the near future than putting a windmill in your yard or solar panels on your roof. Not to say you can’t do both, of course.

But they also make quite clear that there is this magical box that can be installed at your home or business, which can cut your electric bill by roughly 25% … here’s how they describe it:

“And, while America has increased its energy efficiency 46% since 1975, that’s frankly a dull story.

“Not to mention, there’s no money in it. Not the way it’s been done to date…

“But this one company is changing all that.

“No longer will Negawatts come from turning off lights… shutting down unused power strips… or upgrading old appliances to Energy Star versions. And no longer will the savings come together piecemeal, a millionth of a percent at a time.

“Instead… with this new technology… Negawatts come without users having to change their behavior at all. No more guilt from leaving the back porch light on.

“And the savings are so colossal, soon no one will be able to afford not having one.

“Here’s how it works:

“Most modern appliances don’t use energy in a fluid stream. Instead, they ‘pulse’ their use.

“By aligning this pulse use across every appliance, this company’s box is able to greatly reduce the energy needed to run them.

“Meanwhile, when energy flows in between pulses, this box stores it for later use — again, reducing the electricity you need to draw.

“Simple, right? Actually, while the concept is simple, the behind-the-scenes technology is quite difficult. That’s why this company doesn’t have competitors — and likely won’t for a long time.

“It’s easy to see why we expect short-term gains of 144%. In fact, you may think we’re underplaying the potential of this company — and I’m inclined to agree with you.”

And they go on to include several testimonials from other people who’ve also cut their electric bills:

“Forrest S. of Ellicott City, Maryland, had this to say: ‘Last month I saved almost 25% off my electric bill… this month I have saved just over 20%… My (negawatt box) should pay for itself in four months at the current rate of savings. Thank you so much for this wonderful invention.’

“John T., an electrician in San Diego was also impressed: ‘I tested everything with a motor load in my house. I was astonished at the significant reduction in amperage.’

“You’ll hear a similar tale from Robert M. of Bluffton, South Carolina: ‘I am achieving well over the projected savings of 25% and I am confident this will continue into the future.'”

OK, so we have the basic description of what this thing does, a long list of testimonials from people who have apparently used this device, and the knowledge that it’s a tiny 50-cent stock. So who is it?

Well, I’ll admit that I’m quite reluctant to mention the name of the stock here, since the stock is teensy and gives me the heebie jeebies, but I’m pretty sure we’re looking for Power-Save Energy Company (PWSV, trades over the counter and is absolutely tiny, market cap of about $15 million).

The stock was at 50 cents yesterday, though what we might presume is this new attention from Alternative Energy Speculator sent it up well over 60 cents during the day. With a tiny market cap like this, the stock could go pretty much anywhere that investors want to send it with just a little push. They sell a couple version of what I think must be this fabled “Negawatt Box” for residential and commercial use, but it basically sounds like what they’re selling is a variable capacitor.

This is a good opportunity for me to mention that I’m definitely not an electrical engineer, and once we get into amps and watts I start flashing back to High School physics — which was the last time that it mattered that I couldn’t understand amps and watts.

But this is not, if my reading is correct, a particularly revolutionary device — similar tools have been used to control the energy use of big industrial motors for some time, and from what I understand newer Energy Star appliances probably wouldn’t even benefit from this kind of control of your home’s power supply. This is not a smart grid device, it doesn’t communicate with anyone or turn down your air conditioner a bit during peak hours (though such devices do exist and could also be considered “negawatt” creators, and they do help significantly — they’re mostly made by big firms like Honeywell), it just tries to manage the inductive demand on the power supply by your electric motors, storing some power in the capacitors for when it’s needed by your air conditioning compressor or your refrigerator motor.

I really hope that last sentence made sense.

So … the way I read this company’s products — they call them the Power-Save 1200 (residential), 3200 and 3400 (commercial) — they are similar to products that factories might use to reduce their power usage from heavy machinery, and they are probably most useful in homes where there are a lot of old appliances that don’t have capacitors, and where there aren’t a lot of new Energy-Star-level appliances with other energy-management or efficiency doodads built in. Yes, I said “doodads,” just to reinforce the fact that you shouldn’t be listening to me about any of this technical stuff.

But the quotes that this teaser ad used seem to all be from the testimonials that Power-Save uses to sell their product, and the company otherwise matches, so I’m guessing these are our guys.

Unfortunately, what I see when I look at the Power-Save website is … good marketers. Maybe that’s why the Alternative Energy Speculator folks were drawn to them, perhaps they use some of the same copywriters. This firm is a direct-to-homeowner marketer of these products, though they also use distributors (perhaps like their electrician friend Joe), and I imagine the ad is telling the truth about the change in their electric bills. If they’re in an old mansion with 15-year-old air conditioning compressors and old office refrigerators, or running big ‘ol electric printing presses, perhaps the change is even due largely to this device, there’s certainly no way for me to know.

But this company has been around the block before — there was a similarly named Power-save Energy Corp. that was run by the same guy, Michael Forster (yes, Corp instead of Company), and the old Power-Save Corp (then traded OTC as well, under the ticker PWVG) seems to have sold a very similar device called the KVAR Energy Controller, which is still also sold by other companies (with the same 1200 designation) — they were apparently more focused on direct TV ads then, (ie, infomercials) but now are enjoying the lower cost world of internet advertising. I don’t know what happened to the original Power-Save company, but I’m imagining that the shareholders didn’t enjoy spectacular gains when the stock disappeared. Forster himself just filed to sell some shares of PWSV, though you can read that as you like — his official salary is $60,000, so I assume most of the management team, which includes another Forster who I assume is related, gets compensated in stock

Power-Save, by the way, is focused particularly right now on also selling solar power photovoltaic systems, so they do have a way to match folks up with federal renewable energy credits, which at least gets us a toehold on some truth behind the $2,000 tax credit part of the tease. I don’t know how they get to the $6,600 bit, which is one reason why I’m hopeful that I’m wrong and this isn’t the company they’re teasing. The direct-to-homeowner version of this box is about $300, I don’t know how much the commercial ones cost but I’d imagine that the $6,600 would also involve something more dramatic — a solar installation could easily cost that much or far more, for example.

And as far as I can tell, they don’t own any patents and this is not necessarily a unique product (that’s just from a quick search of the USPTO database, it’s certainly possible that I’m wrong) — in trolling around for just a little while online I also ran across other companies that were marketing similar-sounding products, companies like KVAR itself, which does claim patents, Xedia, and Perpetual Green, and I imagine the “secret sauce” is more in the marketing than in the box. But perhaps I’m being too cynical.

When it comes to financials, there isn’t much to say, other than that Power-Save Energy is tiny and unprofitable — they have about 29 million shares issued (though they have permission to go up to 100 million), which at 50 cents means they have a market cap of $14.5 million. They reported net income in the first nine months of 2008 but a net loss for that same period last year (loss of 3 cents a share), the revenue was about $4 million for the first nine months of 2009, about half of which was gross profit before you take out the huge chunks for sales commissions and advertising, let alone the standard administrative expenses. They’re not losing buckets of money, but neither are they currently profitable — and how you feel like valuing a company that’s recently been in the neighborhood of break-even, with annual sales of about $5 million, is certainly up to you. As of the last report they had about $450,000 in cash, which is very close to what their net loss was for the first three months of 2009, so I’d imagine they’ll have to sell some more stock in 2010 unless they enjoy some profitability.

So yes, this is my guess about the company behind that secret “Negawatt box” — it’s certainly possible that Power-Save Energy is real and doing noble and wonderful things, but I confess that my skin starts feeling a little slippery the more I read about them. And it’s also possible that there’s some other company that the Alternative Energy Speculator folks are touting (I’d probably be relieved if so — occasionally it’s good to be wrong, though no more than once or twice a year, please).

If I were a homeowner looking to save big on my bills I’d rather buy a programmable thermostat and put that plastic film stuff over my windows, I’ve already got a house full of energy star appliances which apparently wouldn’t be much helped by the “Power-Save 1200,” and as far as I can tell this kind of capacitor thingamabob doesn’t do anything to cut the power use by lights, or by the mighty racks of powerful thinking machines here at Gumshoe Manor. But that’s just me.

So what do you think? Have a better surmise about this “Negawatt Box” and the company behind it, or any opinion about or experience with these kinds of devices? Let us know with a comment below!

And if you’ve any experience as a subscriber to the Alternative Energy Speculator, click here to let us know how it went by sharing your thoughts over at Stock Gumshoe Reviews. Thanks!


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59 Comments on "Can the “Negawatt Box” Help you Out-Screw Your Power Company?"

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Brian Schultz
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Brian Schultz
January 19, 2010 5:26 pm

I was thinking the company was called “Perpetual Green” –
http://www.perpetualgreen.net/.

But I cannot find a stock for them.

ScottChapman
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January 19, 2010 8:10 pm

I hope it’s perpetual green. I live here in Utah where both power save and perpetual green are based and the pg product is much better. I have one on a c-store and saved $423 the first month alone.

Gary W
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Gary W
January 20, 2010 1:30 am

Negative on negawatts: the box in question is a “power factor controller”, which has been used in factories for over 20 years. It reduces power consumed by motors but does nothing for digital stuff or your plug-in hybrid battery charger. I did due diligence for a client in India on a company in Wales with similar claims. IMHO the steak here is a tiny fraction of the sizzle, but what do I know of investor psychology?

Robert
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Robert
January 20, 2010 9:26 am

I bought the product and had it installed last year. I had to get an electrical permit from the city for $110, find and hire a local electrician who knew how to install it for $200 on top of the $295 for the box. I haven’t noticed much of a reduction in my electric bill but then I don’t have air conditioning, the laundry dryer and home heating use natural gas so not much to save electricity wise. The box might work better in commercial applications.

Josh
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Josh
January 20, 2010 9:29 am

I just signed up for the newsletter on Power Save and the email I got back said ‘Thanks’ and included a promo for Lock Fresh…some new gadget that keeps your fruit and vegetables fresh. Putting some sort of affiliate marketing ad on the first email I receive from this company doesn’t give me the warm fuzzies. How about you all?

Nick Morley
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Nick Morley
January 20, 2010 10:05 am

Thanks again Gumshoe,

I was considering buying the news letter – only to find it’s a stock I can’t purchase from the UK. So, that’s 499 USD still in the bank.

A quick look on yahoo finace shows a move from 50c to 65c so far today though.

Cheers,

Nick

ErnieA
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January 20, 2010 10:07 am

If the homeowner is paying for kWh and not kVAh, then increasing the power factor won’t reduce the energy bill. It appears that this is what this unit is trying to do.

John Ohlson
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John Ohlson
January 20, 2010 10:07 am

I got the pitch, too, and can’t escape the feeling that the claimed month-to-month electric bill reductions have more to do with season change than anything else. Assuming a fair part of the summer electrical load in an office environment is due to air conditioning, as the weather cools off, the bill goes down, “negawatt” box or no.

KENNETH CLARKE
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KENNETH CLARKE
January 20, 2010 10:28 am

The teaser ad shows four decreasing power bills starting in September and running through December for their office in Baltimore. My guess is that the four bills for the same months in the previous year would show similar results. The reason is that the air-conditioning load goes down markedly as one goes from September to December.(After I wrote this I noted the previous comment which says essentially the same thing.)

jay
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jay
January 20, 2010 10:38 am

Perpetual Green sounds too much like perpetual motion for me….

j

Barry
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Barry
January 20, 2010 10:41 am

I bought the PowerSave 1200 shortly after we moved into our newly built house because we have 4 AC units (totaling 12 tons) and a huge wine cooler in the garage that runs almost constantly in the summer.

I have tracked my electric bill for the past 3 1/2 years and can report there’s no significant savings. There ARE some very minor savings but that could be due to our own lifestyle change to conserve or to our acclimation of the FL weather.

Joss Bolton
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Joss Bolton
January 20, 2010 10:49 am

Due diligence on similar company in Wales? Would that be V-Phase? I have fitted a box after reading about it in the Times, ostensibly reduces the voltage coming into the house; have not had time to evaluate it yet. Seems to me, if modern appliances have capacitor technology, the V-phase concept (which my electrician says has been applied commercailly for years)is viable as it reduces the power coming into the house to the level required by your appliances, which is lower than that the power company delivers. V-phase is part of energetix, a limited company. http://www.vphase.com/

Mike
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Mike
January 20, 2010 12:07 pm
****Response from an analog/power supply engineer I work with**** In basic terms the product is two non-polarized capacitors in a box with wires hooked up to it. Most loads in a home look like inductors. This is because the largest loads in a house are typically motors (which are inductors). What this means is that the 120V 60Hz voltage sine wave leads the current sine wave by a phase angle. And if you multiply the voltage and the current you get a portion of power that is “real” power and a portion that is “imaginary” or “reactive” power. What they’re… Read more »
LOBO
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LOBO
January 20, 2010 12:08 pm

I’m glad to have found Gumshoe..what a saving to my dignity. I have bought into so many of these hype News letters and now know to just read Gumshoe! So..MDCE..what say you?

LOBO
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LOBO
January 20, 2010 12:12 pm

OH…I forgot to mention, I severely got my bottom kicked last year for my gullibility.

Tim
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Tim
January 20, 2010 12:23 pm

The world already has the best power saving device they could possibly hope for and it is absolutely free,,,,The human hand,,,used for turning off switches.

biobiz
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biobiz
January 20, 2010 12:37 pm

I noticed on green chips investors news letter where they are trying to get you to buy the name of the companay who makes the negawatt box, that they claim the company holds patents on the device and that cisco and honeywell were late to the table.

mikey
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mikey
January 20, 2010 12:46 pm

the green chip newsletter is great. i’ve made a fortune from them over the last year. you get a lot more than the one pick they tease in a promo letter, ya know?

vaag
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vaag
January 20, 2010 12:57 pm

For a house like mine which doesn’t use much electricity in the first place I can’t help but hear in the background a bevy of green necks all going quack,quack,quack.

Palmer
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Palmer
January 20, 2010 1:33 pm
I am a retired registered electrical engineer and can tell you the claims on “Negawatt Box” are hogwash. I know of no utility that charges homeowners for low power factor. It’s a different story if you have a plant with many high hp electric motors. Any savings realized solely from the use of these devices at home would be minuscule at best. Just Google “reviews on energy saving boxes” and you’ll see plenty of bad reviews. Most of these companies insist that you insulate and turn down your water heater, update windows, check and add insulation, replace all lights with… Read more »
Nathaniel Royko
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Nathaniel Royko
January 20, 2010 2:54 pm

One excellent article. Thank you.

Raj
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Raj
January 20, 2010 5:05 pm
Below is an email received regarding a similar power savings unit for our industrial application – just as an FYI: This is ******** from Thermonic Electric; following on our brief phone conversation here is the additional information: savings on electricity bills from 10 to 30% by recycling the electric power, because the utility company sells you active power but due to the inductive loads caused by machinery/equipment and some inefficiency in delivery a portion of it is converted into reactive power which is unusable and is sent back to the utility company which in turn recycles it and sells it… Read more »
JAM986
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JAM986
January 20, 2010 6:28 pm

MISTER Gumshoe,
I enjoy your great ability to sleuth most enjoyable. Here is one I have been trying to figure out for several days. Care to take a peek?

Thanks

http://agorafinancial.com/reports/VPI/VPI_2010Predictions.php?code=EVPIL133&o=56962&s=58494&u=30111403&l=77978&r=Milo

advantedges
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January 20, 2010 7:47 pm

I am surprised that this is not a Canadian stock being pumped! In skimming over the feedback, no one mentioned the $2,000 government “payment,” (aka Credit in the USA).
What surprised me more was the high response from GummyLand to a teaser on a 50 cent “stock” on the pink sheets. Who trades this kind of stock?
It appears that there was a lot of interest in the topic (was it the “stick it to your power company” theme OR the energy saver concept?). Either way, it is encouraging!

Ernesto
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Ernesto
January 20, 2010 10:16 pm

about pushing magazines: most are
old west sellsmen selling stocks mixtures for hair growth
unbelievable; stock holders who would not listen to Buffet free advice and went along with the other side of the board
and finally thanks to you SGshoe a zeitgaist in the finance world

Karena
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Karena
January 21, 2010 12:53 am

I saw a similar device here in Malaysia, which seemed too good to be true, and after a lot of scientific research I realised it was. Big factories can benefit but for normal homes it is completely useless. So if we can find out the real facts, I expect other potential punters would too. So a good investment?? Pass . Not for me no.

EYoung
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EYoung
January 21, 2010 12:03 pm

Snake Oil salesmen are still alive and well, and peddling wares, it seems like. Thanks, Gumshoe, for sniffing out the new breed/brand of “Snake Oil”.

Hands
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Hands
January 21, 2010 2:15 pm

I saw this product at a home show a few months ago. The entire feel of the booth was very multi-level-market-ish. The salesman showed me his own power bills, both before and after installation and they were quite impressive — but not enough to make me fall for the pitch.

Today {Jan 21st} they’ve announced a direct sales marketing campaign including door to door sales in some areas of California. I’ve always considered door to door sales a poor technique and so I don’t have high hopes for this company.

Which means they’ll be a blazing success by tomorrow.

Daddy Paul
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January 21, 2010 11:45 pm

I know a bit about electrical. This device is pure BS.

Ponce
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Ponce
January 22, 2010 4:15 am
Power companies would rather send only kwatts(KW) as kvars causes unnecessary losses in electric lines. Motors and other inductive load need kvars to excite the devices. So big industrial customers are given incentives if they can supply excitation kvars locally using shunt capacitors. If the customer is able to supply all his kvar requirement, he is said to be operating at 100% power factor(PF). The industrial rate structure is such that if the PF is 85% and above the KWH consumption is multiplied by graduated factors of less than 1. The higher the PF the smaller is the multiplier thus… Read more »
Andrew
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January 22, 2010 1:34 pm

http://www.microplanet.com has a patented technology and some good customers including Whole Foods, Castle and Cooke, the US Coast Guard, Australian Electric Utility Ergon.
Good rise in sales and plenty of potential too! Most likely a better bet than Power Save particularly at .09 at the moment.

Robin Green
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January 22, 2010 1:47 pm
This sounds like nothing more than an energy saving capacitor device, which will make very little difference to anyone’s electricity bill, and will actually not save any energy at all (just make your electricity bill more closely match the electricity you’re actually using, by correcting for the power factor fluctuations of inductive load devices). Only a small percentage of household loads are inductive – and many of those already have capacitors built in (any motor in an energy star qualified appliance is likely to have one, for instance). So the claims these companies who sell so-called negawatt boxes make are… Read more »
Lee T
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Lee T
January 23, 2010 5:29 pm

The DoE looked at power factor correctors aimed at consumers and concluded they don’t work:

http://eetweb.com/power-supplies/powerfactor121509/

Roy
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Roy
January 24, 2010 5:30 pm

And here I was, about to become a
millionair, then there was the familiar scent of BS. Oh well, on
to the next one…….

JT
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JT
January 25, 2010 4:50 pm

ECM’s (electrically commutated motors) that use rectified DC power and are more easily controlled for variable speed operation are replacing many of the squirrel cage inductive motors commonly used in fans, pumps and blowers.

greenbau
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greenbau
January 26, 2010 12:43 pm

Thanks so much for the thorough work and corroboration. The comments are detailed & authoritative too. As a commercial construction estimator I know what capacitors on motors are; I’ve seen these amateur looking boxes at a home show and fully understand that they are not applicable to residences unless you have some big old motors. But sometimes its hard to stand against the floods of hype. So thanks for the reinforcement.

JIM MCLEOD
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JIM MCLEOD
January 26, 2010 1:00 pm
I have no experience with this news letter, but lots of experience with the devise this company is promoting. I bought one from a competeing marketer, Energy Management Solutions, and installed it on my Florida home . It reduced my electric costs by 40 %. I was so impressed, I bought 2 more and installed them in my 2 panel boxes at my 3 year old, Minnesota home. For the first 8 months my electric costs there are down 44% . I do not expect the Power share 1200 company to do spectacular after the initial hype as there are… Read more »
TK
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TK
January 27, 2010 8:50 am

Gumshoe I just want to tell u that when someone is doing a great job we should say something good about it. Talking about Alternative Energy Speculator,I think its just HATING and folks are just using u only to review stocks name for them to grab it…why dont u write critism letter about Elliott wave ads and the rest,is it bcus u are gething paid at the back?.stop hating!

Gravity Switch
Admin
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January 27, 2010 4:16 pm
I’ll continue to try to remember to say nice things when people do a great job, though that certainly isn’t as fun. The picks I’ve sniffed out from this particular newsletter, just FYI, are fairly average — one or two down, one or two up, nothing all that dramatic either way. I do write things, sometimes mean things, about letters published by folks who advertise on my site, thought the big picture and chart-driven guys like Elliott Wave don’t usually tease specific investments for whatever reason (either because it doesn’t work for their letters, or just because they have a… Read more »
Andrew H. Eliason
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Andrew H. Eliason
January 27, 2010 5:37 pm
When I received my electronics training over 40 years ago, the subject of power factor was broached as it is fundamental to the understanding of AC circuits which can have passive resistive, capacitive and inductive components. Therefore, when I began seeing these ads, I thought that the devices were based on sound electronic theory. However, when I checked with a well educated electrician, he told me that the meters used for residential installations are designed to ignore (not charge for) the power wasted by the inductive loads of the motors and transformers in home appliances. Therefore, though you might be… Read more »
TK
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TK
January 28, 2010 6:59 am

Alright Mr Gumshoe,U might be somehow old enough to be in my father’s age mate becus I am in my late 20’s,Married and unemployed and I am just trying to learn the Financial Market,before i will star having my own family and i wont be able to meet

TK
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TK
January 28, 2010 7:17 am
Alright Mr Gumshoe, I understand you but, i just felt maybe both Advisory service firm might be doing a great job expecialy for those who cant digg down to datas to made up their decission’s before investing in some certain stocks which i was thinking of been a member,to help me get off the ground on trading both Short and Long Term. U might be somehow old enough to be in my father’s age mate therefore I will give you that respect becus I am in my late 20’s Married and unemployed. I am just trying to learn the Financial… Read more »
Bob Gilbert
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Bob Gilbert
February 2, 2010 6:56 pm
I am an electrical engineer for an electric utility. There is no inductive or capacitive device (KVAR) that can change KW consumption. What we really need to know is how does your utility bill? If they bill based on KVA (resultant of KW & KVAR) then yes, the claim MAY be true based on reduced KVA billing (assuming your power factor now is less than 100%), but there is no reduction in KWH or KW billing. Before buying 1 of these, have your power company rep explain to you how your electric bill is computed. If they don’t bill based… Read more »
Rudy
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Rudy
February 10, 2010 11:05 am

This is a TOTAL SCAM. I am a top electrician and I know that many people in the industry are confused about power factor as they did not pay attention in school. Many myths and misconceptions circulate.

THERE IS NO POWER OR ENERGY ASSOCIATED WITH VARS!!!! Power factor correction is totally ineffective and unnecessary in residential applications. In heavy industry it frees up system capacity and saves a bit of line loss. THIS ISSUE HAS BEEN WELL UNDERSTOOD FOR AT LEAST ONE HUNDRED YEARS.

P.Konjola
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0
July 28, 2010 8:47 am

Hi
What is the cost of your wealth advisory?

dharouff
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dharouff
July 28, 2010 8:49 pm

Left out – I changed the lights out to CFL's

tomt
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tomt
August 16, 2010 9:12 am
Travis, Just thought I'd mention that their energy bills start in late summer, and go into late Fall, so I suspect their kWh useage would naturally be less anyway. The comparison should be yoy. You are right, in fact capacitors have come on refrigerator motors for 50 years or more. One angle to this technology is in combination with old electric meters that do not respond to quick surges in current as quickly as new ones. The idea here is to draw your power in quick surges which are not fully captured by the slower meter. More on this I… Read more »
FitsArittyler
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FitsArittyler
July 7, 2011 2:03 am

I personally discovered Penny Stock Lists and earned great money with this process … http://bit.ly/xrm705tst1

LBGE is A single Wonderful Pick My partner and I created plenty of currency.

Ace
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Ace
January 19, 2010 9:08 pm

I think its deff Perpetual Green too, but i cant find a stock for that company either

Gravity Switch
Admin
11
January 19, 2010 9:44 pm

Sorry guys, Perpetual Green has similar types of products (could be much better, I have no idea) but isn’t a publicly traded company.

Bill
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Bill
January 20, 2010 11:53 am

Perpetual Green is privately held, according to their web site.

Gravity Switch
Admin
11
January 19, 2010 9:46 pm

Thanks Scott — I don’t know where Power-save’s business is concentrated, but the company is headquartered in CA.

smiling2bank
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0
smiling2bank
January 20, 2010 11:24 am

The average consumer will not understand volts, amps, or power factor. Consumers will buy any product if the sales pitch is good. Hmmmmm…. Sounds a lot like Investors will buy any stock if the sales pitch is good. And that is why I am here at the Gumshoe. To sort out fact from fiction. Thanks, Gumshoe.

smiling2bank
Guest
0
smiling2bank
January 20, 2010 11:40 am

I agree with Gary. The negawatt is correct in theory, but wrong in the application. These controllers should not go across the main incoming line of the home. Each appliance with a motor should have its own controller built in. I know that Power Efficiency Corp (PEFF.OB) is working with appliance manufacturers to incorporate their E-save technology into appliances. IMHO, PEFF also has the best industrial motor controller available.

Bill
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Bill
January 20, 2010 12:06 pm

After a little more research, I agree it’s PWSV. Activity and bump looks right to go with the tease..it was $.50 three days ago, etc. Nice work Brian…I also liked the “doodads” commentary.

stockcrazy10
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stockcrazy10
January 20, 2010 7:36 pm
greenbau
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greenbau
January 26, 2010 12:37 pm
thanks for that feedback mikey, I’ve been looking at the sales pitches for Green Chips for quite a while but dont invest often enough to want to pay a subscription. The few stocks I teased out from hints in their promos (call me gumshoe Jr ?)have not done so well. But its been a poor 18 months for PV etc. Since I invest as much with my heart s my head and only want stuff (apart from gold my main friend in the last year or so)that can hopefully do some good, maybe I should go green chip.
John Campbell
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John Campbell
January 26, 2010 1:56 pm

What is PWSV?

A.M. Deist
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A.M. Deist
February 21, 2010 2:32 am

I can’t speak to the power-save, but I just purchased a power miser from another company and in NW Florida our winter has been much colder than usual. My bills are running almost $100 less per month than my neighbors. I run lots of motors with 2 refrigerators, 1 freezer, swimming pool, sprinkler system, and other appliances. The company also guarantees in writing that the miser will pay for itself within 5 years or they will reimburse me the difference. I am a believer.

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