“The Industrial Pioneer of India … an unprecedented opportunity for growth.”

Sniffing out a teaser for Benjamin Shepherd's Global Investment Strategist

By Travis Johnson, Stock Gumshoe, March 25, 2013

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Global Investment Strategist is the newsletter that was called Silk Road Investor back when it was launched with Yiannis Mostrous at the helm six or seven years ago — it was given the less evocative new name once the market crash and the huge wave of Chinese frauds made investors worry about the new “silk road” … and now, with the departure of Yiannis Mostrous, it has a new “chief strategist” at the helm in Benjamin Shepherd, who previously ran the ETF-focused offering at Investing Daily.

But it appears that they’ve kept the storytellers on the copywriting staff at Investing Daily, and the new Global Investment Strategist ads tread the same path as the old ones — promising riches from emerging markets.

We haven’t covered one of their ideas in quite some time but under Mostrous they did tease a few interesting ones, ranging from Jollibee in the Philippines to Keppel Corp in Singapore, with only their Russian teased picks being real disasters, so let’s take a look and see what tale Shepherd has to tell us (for $497 a year).

Here’s the intro that pretty much sets the stage for us today:

“From the forests of India comes a new economy car that the world’s billions can afford… And now this innovative company in India has just acquired two of the world’s most sought-after brands in luxury cars…

“Economy Meets Luxury: The Two New Cars That Will Drive the World

“The facts don’t lie: There are 7 billion people in this world, and 3 billion of them live in areas that are developing rapidly. That’s 3 billion people who anxiously want to buy their very first car, but most of the world’s vehicles are way, way out of reach. Until now.

“This car company in India has put rigorous cost controls on every single detail of their new economy car—from the thrifty single side mirror to the sparing (but effective) three lug nuts per wheel—and have created a ~$2,995 car that’s now in reach for this giant, upwardly-mobile segment of the world.

“Simultaneously, this company has used their boardroom prowess to purchase two premium brands of luxury cars that are well-established and well-respected in the U.S., Canada and Europe.

“Early sales figures for both the economy and luxury ventures give promise to an unprecedented opportunity for growth.”

He likens this story to the early days at Ford, when they reinvented manufacturing and transportation by cutting costs, streamlining, and appealing to the masses with a low price …

“My stock pick even has their own version of Henry Ford himself: an unstoppable innovator who inspired his nation, reinvented manufacturing standards and reinvigorated the national workforce.”

And of course, he also tells us about his incredible stock-picking acumen, claiming that “his” GIS portfolio is up 118% over the last five years. Maybe he was involved in the newsletter during those years of gains, but as far as I can tell he wasn’t on the masthead until just a few months ago.

Some of you will already know the name of this car they’re teasing, and of the company that’s selling it — it was very big news several years ago — but don’t go spoiling the surprise for everyone else just yet, we’ve got a few more clues to parse:

“Selling to the world’s billions wasn’t a last-minute idea. My stock pick began development on the Economical Wonder in 2003, and didn’t release the first production model until 2008.

“But it’s only been in the last few months that the true production goals of this car have been realized. A hundred years have been building up to this moment.”

And a few more details for you …

“The release of the Economical Wonder hasn’t been without a few bumps in the road. This company recently made a wide-scale voluntary replacement of a finicky starter on 140,000 of these cars. That number may sound large, but you have to remember that this is a car designed for a volume of millions and millions.

“In reality, the cost of the recall was only $20 million, and while it’s a tough blow to a tight-margin vehicle, it unequivocally proved to the world that this company isn’t like the rest, and that they stand behind their product.

“But there’s a point here that’s even more important: My stock pick is honing their product and learning lessons along the way, just as Ford did in the teens of the 20th century. My stock pick will emerge as the only company in the world who will know how to make the dream of the world’s cheapest car into an everyday reality.

“That’s a competitive advantage so extreme that it will reshape the world’s concept of ‘economy market.’ …

“… the Economical Wonder has finally achieved its first major production milestone: one million units a year.”

We learn that they’re now securing capacity to increase that production by 150%, that they will expand outside of India …. but also that there’s another side to this company, they’re not just the maker of the next breakthrough tiny, cheap car, they’re also luxury automakers:

“The fact that my stock pick has now entered the luxury market is a testament to their multi-faceted long-term strategy.

“This puts my stock pick in America, in England, in Europe and in the rest of the world’s developed countries with two well-known brands.

“Brand #1 is known for their premium line of sedans, grand tourers and executive cars. Since their acquisition, my stock pick has poured significant sums of money into R&D for new models that reflect both the tradition of the brand as well as ground-breaking innovation. It’s a tough tightrope, but so far response has been largely positive. They successfully sold 250,000 units last year, worldwide.

“Brand #2 is known for their line of SUVs, which are classy, sporty and luxurious all at the same time. My stock pick has invested an equal amount into the R&D for this brand, but the effect of the updates is more subtle. It’s been a success: Their sales have jumped 38% since the acquisition, and this is largely due to the brand’s entrance an into untapped market. This includes a notable offensive in China, where my stock pick has opened over 100 new dealerships.

“China is a significant part of the luxury plan. China’s high-end automobile market is relatively new, and their tastes are different than those of L.A., New York or Paris. In short: China loves SUVs, so they love Brand #2.

“Nearly 20,000 units were sold in China alone, an 80% increase over previous attempts. The ink on these numbers is still drying, but early predictions suggest that Brand #2 will be a hit in China. That would mean a completely new luxury market for my stock pick, and one that isn’t yet ruled by any other brand.”

OK, so … who’s ready for guessing?

Yes, you’re right — this is Tata Motors (TTM). The tiny car that was launched with a $2,000 sticker price is the Tata Nano, Luxury “Brand #1” is Jaguar and “Brand #2” is Land Rover, both of which they bought from … Ford, just to come full circle. That was about five years ago, and they paid something like $2.5 billion for the brands at a time when Ford was desperately trying to stay alive without government support, refocus, and jettison their small luxury nameplates (as that process continued over recent years they also sold Volvo and discontinued Mercury).

At the time it seemed like a pretty bold move for Tata, perhaps even a nice postcolonial bit of revenge as they took control of the iconic British brands, but it does seem to have worked out pretty well so far in giving them a more diversified global business and some technology and design they may be able to import to India. Tata has been teased before a few times, as you can imagine — it was hard to resist the storytelling appeal of the Tata Nano when it was being developed and launched in 2008 and 2009, and thanks to some good timing it also makes the list of top teaser picks because it so happened that Bryan Tycango over at Asian Growth Stocks teased it back in March of 2009, when the global financial crisis had brought pretty much all emerging market stocks down. And down hard. It got down to just a few dollars back then, bouncing back later that year, and has more recently spent a few years bumping up and down between $15 and $30 as news and sentiment tides have moved in and out.

And yes, most of the teasers back in 2008 and 2009 also used the same basic spiel, that Tata is the new Ford and the Nano is the new Model T, ready to revolutionize transportation in the world’s second most populous country.

Tata is a large company, with a market cap of around $15 billion, but it’s also a fairly small cog in the much larger Tata Group, which is one of India’s largest family-controlled conglomerates. There are apparently now 32 separate listed Tata companies, though just a handful of them make up the heart of the $100 billion group — the biggest is Tata Consulting, which is about a $50 billion engineering and communications outsourcing, software and business consulting firm, but they also have a large steel company, power company, telecoms, other industrial companies, etc.

But it is the automobile company that gets most peoples’ attention — they built this up as the first Indian car company of consequence over many years, and though the foundation of Tata Motors is really in commercial vehicles, building many of the trucks and buses that have kept India moving for decades, their focus in recent years has been on the Nano, an inexpensive modern car meant to help families upgrade from motorscooters, and on the Ace, a tiny urban truck for deliveries. They are the biggest Indian car company, but they’re not the biggest seller of passenger cars — that probably falls to Suzuki, which has the top selling cars, Hyundai, or Mahindra, Tata’s largest Indian competitor. The Tata Nano has breached the top ten in car sales in India but isn’t even Tata’s largest seller yet.

India has been in an economic funk for a while, and Indian auto sales in particular have been declining for several months in a row (and will have their first down year in more than a decade), so that’s part of the reason why what should be one of the more exciting growth stories in one of the more exciting growth markets is currently trading with a PE ratio of about six or seven. Several pundits are now starting to stick their necks out and say that India is “cheap enough to buy,” though I can’t say that I’ve looked at any Indian stocks in quite a while. There’s been a lot of news out of India this month, as the new budget failed to excite much interest among investors who were looking for some more dramatic reform — or even some specific stimulus measures to help specific industries like autos.

The country is obviously still compelling for long-term investors, if for no other reason than that India is the second largest country in the world (and may become the largest in 10-15 years at current growth rates), it has grown faster than almost any other economy outside of China over the last five years (until the recent lull), with rapid growth expected eventually to resume, and it is also one of the only really large countries whose demographics are set up well for the next couple decades — they are younger, with more young families and young workers. China and Japan are going to have worker shortages and high dependency ratios before too long (well, Japan is already there — the US will be there soon, too, if we don’t increase immigration), as low birth rates manifest themselves in small numbers of workers to support each retiree, but India won’t have that problem in the foreseeable future — the average Indian is still well under 30 years of age, and that will remain true for the next decade. And the consumer marketers, including those who sell automobiles, are slathering at the huge population of new workers and emerging consumers — the population of new workers in India (those aged 18-25) is greater than the entire population of Brazil.

US car companies have been losing money in India for more than a decade now, and most of the other global majors have also failed to gain traction in this heavily bureaucratic, challenging, fragmented market, but those who can produce at genuinely low costs and appeal to young families and first time car buyers seem to be doing pretty well — just not this year. Car sales are down in recent months thanks to high interest rates, high gas prices, and generally weak economic situation for young first-time car buyers. Tata has been trying to continually improve the dealership network and the service they provide, part of the appeal of the Nano has been that it’s easily assembled at local dealerships to a large degree, and has cheap and widely available parts, and they’ve also recently begun taking credit cards and doing other innovative financing in partnership with national banks — so they are trying to really rejuvenate this low end of the auto market, not necessarily just trying to take customers from the more expensive compact car makers like Suzuki but really to create a new car-buying and ownership experience and build a new market among people who wouldn’t otherwise own cars at all.

That’s pretty ambitious, and it seems to me like it’s probably a good thing that they have the steadier truck and commercial vehicle business to keep them going when the Nano and their other small vehicles hit rough patches (they have more than 60% of the commercial vehicle market in India, only about 10% of the passenger car market). And, of course, they have those iconic UK luxury brands as well — Land Rover and Jaguar aren’t likely to be Indian stories anytime soon, but they do have niche businesses in Europe and the US and they are hoping to participate more fully in the renaissance of Chinese luxury auto sales over the next decade … with a sense, it appears to me, that they have to push in pretty quickly and establish a strong brand in China, particularly for Land Rover, before others beat them to the top of the pyramid.

They are opening a new assembly plant for Jaguar in China soon, and they’ve been producing flat out for other markets even as Europe slumps, with Jaguar apparently having plenty of appeal in places like Turkey and Eastern Europe … but in terms of volume they’re still very small. Those luxury brands have been doing well in emerging markets like Brazil and China, too, generating much more growth than the local Indian market or Tata brand for Tata Motors in 2012, with nice earnings and margins for the Jaguar Land Rover division last quarter as the Indian motors division lost money. You can see the quarterly conference call transcript here if you’re interested in the details.

So … will the Indian consumer economy and passenger car sales recover in the next year or two, and will Tata Motors improve their standing in that market? That’s the big question for building the Nano and the Tata Motors brand, though it may be that they can grow the luxury businesses overseas and continue to offset some of that weakness at home. I think investing in India is likely to return to favor at some point, and the economy is likely to grow, though there is always a big political/reform/infrastructure question when it comes to sustainable Indian growth and I have no idea whether that growth will return as soon as this year or next year. Tata is certainly a formidable company, with a strong focus on building businesses over the long term, so I wouldn’t bet again them turning the Nano into a big business — but they’re going to need a bit more of a spark from the Indian economy (or falling interest rates, or falling oil prices) to really get the motor running for that little car and for their domestic business. The stock is not particularly expensive, and they’re not overly burdened with debt, so it may be that Tata will be a decent performer as their markets recover or grow.

I’m not overwhelmingly excited about Tata Motors and I don’t think I’ve ever owned the stock, but often exciting stocks are overrated — it’s your money, so what do you think about the Nano, or about Jaguar Land Rover, or Indian investing in general? Let us know with a comment below.

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50 Comments on "“The Industrial Pioneer of India … an unprecedented opportunity for growth.”"

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bmc123
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bmc123
March 25, 2013 1:26 pm

Oh boy, what a story TTM has been for me personally. It first crossed my path at $4 and change. I didn’t act on it then, checked back in on it later only to see it was at $8. The amazing thing is, I let it pass again. I finally bought it at $12 and rode it up to a little over $20. Made some very decent money on it but nothing compared to what I could have done. Still, who was brave in early 2009! 🙂

Von
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Von
March 25, 2013 1:29 pm

BUY AMERICAN

whatch
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whatch
March 25, 2013 8:26 pm
I am in total agreement Von. The problem here is that if you examine virtually everything you own, it is very hard to find anything truly American made. I even went to purchase building materials and found that with all the timber production in this country, I was forced to buy imported lumber. It’s pretty easy to find an American company (including automobile manufacturers) that heavily resource outside of the country. The problem is corporate greed and government making it profitable for them to leave and put Americans out of work and sell back to the very people they abandoned.… Read more »
ptoomen
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ptoomen
March 27, 2013 12:39 am

wayne, when you say truly american, do you mean red indian? please let me know their products if you find any – i am looking to buy some too.

whatch
Member
15
whatch
March 27, 2013 10:30 am
No, I’m speaking of companies that are born in and actually produce product in this country. Companies that resource goods, services, and materials here and provide jobs in America thus making a real contribution to the state of the economy and welfare of the United States. As for native American business. I’m sure there are some out there but I’m not familiar with any. Unfortunately they are and always have been the most oppressed race of people in their own land of all races here. And I might add the most ignored and left out of the historical prosperity this… Read more »
Tom
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Tom
March 29, 2013 3:57 pm

check out Tesla [TSLA] if you want to buy American. Very exciting cars, a constantly innovating company, environmentally friendly, and they’re American.

Deborah G Flynn
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March 31, 2013 5:40 am
I’m 62 and allow myself one or two spec plays with profits but I have to think woth Obamacare and all the ways he’s killing our finances I have to stay a bit conservative in order to protect my nest egg. That being said I do think there are opportunities abroad so I bought into Wisdom tree Japan small cap dividend fund and it is doing well. I am diversifying into the Pacific Rim a bit and have been quite happy. My only concern with India is that as a BRIC country China is always looming in the background and… Read more »
Bill
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Bill
March 25, 2013 1:53 pm

Hey bmc123 coulda woulda shoulda. I shoulda bought Ford at $2 bach then. Hey Von I hope they build it here and it gets 200 mpg like the new VW in Germany. And it costs less than $3000. They will sell billions of them.

bmc123
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bmc123
March 26, 2013 5:01 am

Bill, a mate of mine did buy Ford back then – @ $1.50 – and constantly reminds me of that fact! 🙂

Mark Robucks
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Mark Robucks
March 25, 2013 1:55 pm

Tata could be the exception. Although, I have found that auto manufacturers overall have presented me with above average challenges when trying to make meaningful, consistent, play by normal investment rules, money with, or at least that has been my experience over 30 or so years. And, I would think that could be expecially so today. I have always tried to avoid investing in any company that I would not want to own and operate myself as a business… betting my future on, all things being considered.

vivian lewis
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0
March 25, 2013 2:03 pm
yeah we own Tata Motors, TTM, as a Passage to India stock. We also own a generic drug firm from there. I tend to mistrust the gang buying every share out there to track some index. I do not like Indian IT or banks very much. So we look for good well-managed entrepreneurial companies with transparent accounts. Both Tata Motors and Dr. Reddy’s (or drug firm) are transitioning to new outsider-ish management (the new Tata chief is not even Indian but he is, like the Tata clan, a Parsi by religion). The founding Dr. Reddy (who had a PhD in… Read more »
rmuthup
Irregular
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rmuthup
March 25, 2013 2:41 pm

Interesting comments. I own TTM and has been a profitable investment.

Are you referring to Ascendas India Trust (CY6U.SI) as the backdoor exposure to the Indian IT sector. The company is based out of Singapore, and the Trust seems to have suffered from the weakening of the Indian Rupee vis-a-vis Singapore dollar. What are the tax implications of buying such a Trust for US citizens?

thanks,
Raja

vivian lewis
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0
March 25, 2013 2:58 pm
dear Raja, the impact is not how the rupee acts against the S$ but for US residents and investors how it moves against the US$. The trend is for the rupee to range against the greenback while the Singapore dollar is forever rising. As for the tax implications, we get to pay normal tax on our distributions not taxed at source (by the Ascendas REIT) because we bought it with US dollars from a US brokerage. It trades here as ACNDF. If you own it in another country than the USA I don’t know what happens. But most foreign REITs… Read more »
rmuthup
Irregular
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rmuthup
March 26, 2013 4:10 pm

Vivian:
Thank you. I will sure check it out.
“We try real hard to be sensible globalists without the hype. WE have more subscribers named Patel than ones called Smith”.
:-).

Raja

1027
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1027
March 25, 2013 2:23 pm

Kindly reply my remark of March 22, that SSL didn’t license Shell for GTL
Thanks – Alfredo

vivian lewis
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March 25, 2013 2:41 pm

huh?

barrybwa
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barrybwa
March 25, 2013 2:40 pm

WHY NOT JUST RECOMMEND A STOCK WITHOUT ALL THE HONEY COATED RHETORIC IN THE FIRST PARAGRAPH OTHER THEN THAT YOUR ON THE BALL

Reg Johnson
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Reg Johnson
March 25, 2013 3:04 pm

Party pooper…. Where is the fun then?

Thomas deLackner
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Thomas deLackner
March 25, 2013 3:02 pm

I wonder how many people did not figure this out within a few paragraphs. I’ve owned TTM, it is a great story and all, but it right now doesn’t seem like a good moment to own it.
Thomas

sam
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sam
March 25, 2013 7:30 pm
I would say, it would be a good buy soon just above the support line around $24 where it may bottom out. I own it and may buy more. TTM made all time high soon after they annouced “NANO”; but it was a failure because of safety issues. The issues have been resolved now. However, I recently learned that their NANO has a competition from Bajaj Motors, but you can buy their stock only in India. There is a teaser going around on “Woder Car”. I don’t know who they are teasing, whther TTM or Bajaj Motors. Probabaly “Gumshoe” can… Read more »
Viktor M
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March 25, 2013 6:11 pm

What has happened to the Indian compressed air driven car? I was hoping to see a network of filling stations served by compressed air pipelines with a central compression pump powered by a windmill……….Resulting in millions of vehicles literally driven by the wind.

whatch
Member
15
whatch
March 26, 2013 6:28 pm

I found a follow up article the other day on this. I think they ran out of air. Volume and storage were real issues as the article read. I’m not sure I’d want all the amount of pressurized air that would be necessary to make it viable under me anyway. In the right crash it could be worse than the old Ford Pinto. Just think if the fill cap were broken off in a crash, you could have the first passenger vehicle in orbit. “To Infinity And Beyond”

Deborah G Flynn
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0
March 31, 2013 5:43 am

Gag me with the green let’s be real alternative energy isn’t there yet at a cost efficient means anyway. So invest in what is profitable now. Put your conscience on the back burner

whatch
Member
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whatch
March 31, 2013 10:26 am
Deborah, I don’t know which of us you were replying to but, I just can;t help but respond. You by your own admission don’t have a hell of a lot of years on myself. And, like me if you have a pair of eyes and a decent memory you have had to see the same environmental impacts uncontrolled emissions of all types has made over the past relatively short 50 or so years. As for me. I’m not a tree huger (I even drive a big ole gas guzzler truck) but I have enough sense to know that we can’t… Read more »
Mark
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Mark
March 25, 2013 10:58 pm

Jollibee Foods JBFCF or what ever I bought in then sold outI Like 2 years ago. I don’t think I lost on it, but did not make money. Anybody still follow it ? It seemed good when I bought it at 1.80 I think it stuck around 2.00 for a very long extended perion of time. So I got rid of it. Are they selling spagetti all over China today?

blufox
Member
12
March 26, 2013 2:33 am

I bought and sold TTM from 2005 through 2008 and made a bit, lost a bit and decided, then, that India was not the place for me to invest. I actually only have 50% of my portfolios in US stocks, 35% Canadian, 8% European, and 5% South American with dribs and drabs in other locations. Tata is a very well run company but my only reason for previous investing was believing that the Indian economy would grow faster than it did.

who noze
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0
March 26, 2013 5:45 am

vivian lewis stock pickr extradinar waiting for bombardier to exploe a vivian lewis pick

Anonymous Questions
Member
1
March 26, 2013 10:18 am

WHY LET US SMALL FOLK KNOW ABOUT THIS NOW WHEN 99.9% OF US HAVE NO SUCH MONEY TO SCRATCH OURSELVES WITH LET ALONE PUT $25 ON FOR A STOCK (TTM) THAT’S ALREADY HAD IT’S GOOD DAY. FEELS LIKE SUCH A MOCKERY NOW. what’s the point here? – bewildered.

Leon Ward
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Leon Ward
March 26, 2013 4:41 pm

Hi Travis,

I’m a business man from South Africa that used to live in the States, my wife and kids are American- following your articles daily. Thanks for your sincere advice, it’s surprising to see how many Teasers are out there ” Just promising the world” for a subscription fee……………with lots of selling Bulls#*^*! I’m surprised that they can steal hard earned money like that?
Welldone! Proud of you!

Regards from Cape Town

danielj1960
Irregular
17
March 26, 2013 5:42 pm

I love the Irregulars Quick Take feature. If your impatient or busy buy an Irregular membership best deal on the net by far!

rotrob80
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rotrob80
March 27, 2013 10:27 am

What do you think about hecla.I have bought and sold this stock several times and always came out ahead.. I am now buying.

halneiman
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0
halneiman
March 30, 2013 12:21 pm

i’mnew to all of this. but,i have you tagged n my computer as i have purchased a few newsletters based on the teases. of course i may be just plain nuts as much of my personal research is in actually contacting extra celestials. REALLY! No success yet but I’m not giving up.My hope remains that they are wiser then us and not just more scientificaly advanced.
After the last election and the current nonsense I am a little depressed. Sorry about that!
Hal

Myron Martin
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0
March 30, 2013 1:00 pm

I bought Tata Motors a few years ago when it was under $10. and think I made a few dollars on the stock, can’t remember exactly, but it was not in my portfolio very long. Investing in foreign stocks is not that easy to do, but I have used country specific ETF’s quite successfully some years ago. I find following specific markets easier than following a whole bunch of individual foreign stocks.

Annabelle Herbert
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Annabelle Herbert
March 30, 2013 3:50 pm

Hey Alan, lay off the bowtie. I love the look. You’re a GUY, what do you know?? I also love all the clever palaver in the lead-ups to the big reveal. Don’t change a thing Travis. The Thinkolater rules! Annabelle

Dennis
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Dennis
March 30, 2013 5:39 pm

Don’t be mislead by companies like Toyota, Honda and Hyundai that have facilities in the US, but their HQ is another country. Most of the money is leaving the country. At least Toyota and Hyundai have their North American technical centers within 30 minutes of my house in the Ann Arbor area and they have hired many GM and Chrysler and maybe some Ford castoffs. So they are keeping some Americans employed. I am too pro American to purchase a foreign auto manufacturers stock.

Great work Travis and the feedback section is great with many different opinions.

Steve Smaldone
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Steve Smaldone
March 31, 2013 2:17 pm
I’ve never written in for anything before in my life, maybe loosing some of hair, teeth, etc. over the years has something to do with that. In any event, I sure understand and agree with Wayne and Dennis’ comments although I also understand other folks may not agree with this view. I’ve tried to hit the buy button for Toyota and other foreign stocks in my private investment account but I just can’t do it and for some reason, I’m proud of that. In my case I truly want to buy American, American born companies that produce products right here… Read more »
Alan Harris
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Alan Harris
March 31, 2013 3:22 pm
Im sorry but this is a rather outdated parochial view. If everyone did this, there would be no international trade and you guys wouldnt have progressed beyond horses and stetsons. Are you seriously advocating that we should only buy intra national products. Look at your export figures and ask yourself what your economy would look like if no one else bought your export products. You dont just sell product any more….you sell the knowledge and means to make the product elsewhere. Didnt you imagine that one day they would start selling the product back to you if they could make… Read more »
whatch
Member
15
whatch
March 31, 2013 6:57 pm
I’m not sorry Alan, but you’re a pampas idiot. You have no idea apparently of the sentiment behind the statement that Steve made. Perhaps you are in the dark ages your self and don’t understand that America does and has always drawn in the greatest minds in the world inventing technology that greedy corporations have lately been contracting out to ultra low wage, child labor countries like communist China putting American workers out on the streets. Not to mention that these countries have the wonderful reputation of outright steeling that technology because they don’t have the technological capacity to develop… Read more »
Alan Harris
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Alan Harris
March 31, 2013 7:49 pm
Pampas? I thought that was a type of grass. What the heck…. If you stopped ranting for a second you’d understand that the American Dream is all about self fulfilment….not national commitment. I agree that some of the greatest innovative minds came from/to America…. no question. But what IS America? Its a piece of this planet inhabited by a range of people looking for a better future. Their dreams/aspirations are/were no different to the peoples of China/Brasil/India/Tibet. And now that American dreamers have sold their (not your) technology, they will make it cheaper coz their cost base is lower. Stop… Read more »
whatch
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whatch
March 31, 2013 8:48 pm
I could go on with this battle for as long as you like but this will my last volley with an arrogant prick like you. As for the American dream. You can’t imagine what that is. As for American technology. You can’t find any place in my rant where I called it MY technology. As for China/Brazil/India/Tibet (and BTW it’s spelled Brazil with a “Z”). Unlike MY American ancestors they have never made the conscious assertive decision to kick their would be rulers back across the Atlantic as MY ancestors did and claim their independence therefore taking control of their… Read more »
Rick Collins
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Rick Collins
March 31, 2013 4:42 pm

Well said, Alan. Compete globally or get left behind.

whatch
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whatch
March 31, 2013 11:40 pm
To all who have been witness to the bitter exchange that has taken place here. I know that this is not the place for that kind of behavior and exchange. I offer my apology to those who may have been appalled by the exchange. I let my temper get the better of me and I am sorry that I let that happen. I cannot apologize without also offering my heartfelt regret and apology to the owners of this forum. I will try in the future to curb my apatite for a fight when I feel provocation by the remarks of… Read more »
Alan Harris
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Alan Harris
April 1, 2013 8:25 am
Well said….this is neither the time or place. But however you interpreted what i said, I certainly WASN’T knocking America or Americans…..just saying, everyone on this planet wants a piece of the pie, and with a few billion extra mouths demanding a taste, you must expect a fight. Information moves around the globe in nano seconds these days, so there are few technological secrets for long. Add cheap labour to that and America/ns face huge competition and unemployment. Britain had a similar Buy British campaign some years ago……. everyone swore allegance and proudly bought the T shirt from the £… Read more »
Tom
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Tom
April 4, 2013 11:32 pm

My comment earlier in a sub-thread may have not been noticed, so I just wanted to say a few words again to those of you that care about the environment and want to buy American – I suggest you look at Tesla [TSLA] as soon as possible…

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