“This Tiny, Unknown Biotech is About to Unleash Its ‘Holy Grail’ Drug”

Biotech Supertrader teases that "This May be the Most Radical Advance in Medicine in the Last 100 Years"

By Travis Johnson, Stock Gumshoe, January 8, 2014

Robert Morris is helming a biotech-focused stock newsletter that’s called Biotech Supertrader (modesty has no place in the world of newsletter promotions, of course), and I’ve never covered this letter before so I thought I ought to have a look at the latest teaser we’ve been asked about.

Morris, incidentally, has been featured in our pages before — but that was back when he was editor of China Stock Insider at the same publisher. That letter, like almost all China-focused investment newsletters, seems to have disappeared quietly into that good night … which probably tells you that it’s time to invest in China again, since the newsletter publishers are ignoring the Middle Kingdom and rushing out their pitches about biotech and tech stocks. At the time, Morris was teasing NQ Mobile (NQ), which has turned out to be pretty good if you bought it down there in the $6-8 neighborhood (though it’s been a wild ride).

So now what’s he pitching for his Biotech Supertrader?

Well, the destruction of “Man’s deadliest disease”, of course. Here’s how the teaser gets our attention:

“This Tiny, Unknown Biotech is About to Unleash Its ‘Holy Grail’ Drug on Man’s Deadliest Disease

“Their ‘Guided Missile Approach’ Could Save Thousands of Lives Each Year

“It’s about to become the most talked about advancement in cancer treatment in our lifetimes and you can lock in a life-transforming fortune if you act quickly….

“I’m urging my subscribers to load up on this stock NOW….

“I’ve just uncovered a tiny, unknown biotechnology company with a new cancer drug in phase 3 clinical trials which is showing remarkable success at treating several types of cancer.

“Their scientists have found an innovative approach to cancer care which involves a breakthrough in treatment. It goes deep inside the inner workings of our cells.

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“Plus, this medicine looks to be many times more effective and with fewer side effects than the chemo, radiation, and drug therapies currently available.”

If there’s one thing that investors know can make them rich and make them feel good about themselves and the world, it’s a cure for cancer — we’ve seen that effective cancer treatments can and do (occasionally) turn little biotech stocks into gigantic successes, so the dream lives on that you’re going to catch one of these lottery tickets and own the next Genentech. Will we be so lucky? Well, let’s see which one he’s pitching:

“When this drug wins FDA approval – which I believe it will – this small company’s $4.16 stock price will go straight to the moon.

“And the market for this drug is absolutely huge!

“You see, this small biotech is targeting its new drug, let’s call it ‘drug S’, at cancers of the blood and bone marrow. And it is already in very promising phase 3 trials for these two types of cancer.

“But here’s where it gets really interesting. It looks like the drug this company is developing will also work on other types of cancer!

“There are positive signs it works on Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) too. There are 1.1 million people with this type of malignancy. Just in the United States alone there are over 300,000 patients with this disease according to The American Cancer Society. Each desperate for a cure.

“Plus it looks like ‘drug S’ may turn out to be an effective treatment for ovarian Cancer. There are more than 204,000 new cases of ovarian cancer diagnosed worldwide each year with 22,280 of these in the United States according to the National Cancer Institute estimates.”

So … who is it? Thinkolator sez this is Cyclacel Pharmaceuticals (CYCC)

Cyclacel is indeed a little biotech around $4 (it closed at $4.35 yesterday), with a market capitalization of only about $80 million — so be careful, we’re a big enough group here that if just a small percentage of Stock Gumshoe readers got enthused about this stock it could drive the shares up, less than a million dollars worth of shares trade each day (Biotech Supertrader says they limited their readership to 750 people — I don’t know if that’s still their cap or if they’ve hit it, but we’ll have more folks than that reading this free article).

And like many biotech stocks, it’s got some impressive scientists and it’s been losing money for a long time as they’ve been searching for a viable drug (their current lead drug also was a big focus of theirs back when it was in Phase 1 trials five or more years ago, so that’s a good reminder of the time these things take, it’s just starting Phase 3 trials now). It looks like they must have gone public in 2004, when they were about eight years old, and a quick scan of ten years of their financials over at Morningstar indicates that they’ve never generated more than a token amount of revenue (meaning, they’ve probably had some research collaboration payments or partnership funding, but never got a product to market), and have accumulated more than $250 million in losses to date. And had two reverse splits to keep the price from sinking far into penny territory.

So that’s not unusual, but it means that — as with all developmental-stage biotechs — it’s not about the financials or the fundamentals, it’s about what’s going to happen in their clinical trials and whether things are going well enough that they can continue to finance the trials … which get much more expensive as you progress through Phase 2 and Phase 3.

All I know about them so far is that they say they’ve got enough cash to get through enrollment in their key Phase 3 study for “drug S” (which is sapacitabine) as of September when they last updated their investor presentation, but I know nothing about the science or the competing cancer drugs that are out there or how fabulous this particular one might be, so I asked our favorite medical writer, Doc Gumshoe (who, yes, is not a doctor) to check them out quickly and chime in. Here’s what he could share after looking into them for a few minutes (he’s just looking at the medical stuff, not so much the “investor presentations”):

    Cyclacel’s Prospects

    Cyclacel has three drugs in development at this time, and is involved in eight clinical trials with these drugs, not including two clinical trials that have been terminated. Their top contender is sapacitabine which targets the division of cancer cells. If you can prevent cancer cells from dividing and reproducing, you have the cancer whipped, so targeting cancer cell division (or mitosis, which is the technical term) is a highly promising avenue for treating cancer. However, we need to take note of the fact that sapacitabine is one of a large number of drugs that propose to fight cancer by this method.

    At present, all eight of Cyclacel’s clinical trials involve sapacitabine. Of these, at least one has been completed – a Phase 1 study of the safety and pharmacology of the drug. Four others are current, with no information about results. These are likely Phase 1 or small Phase 2 studies, to assess safety, determine what a correct dose might be, and evaluate whether the drug does what it’s supposed to do in human subjects with the target diseases, which in this case include acute myeloid leukemia (AML), cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, and some advanced solid tumors. Prior to the clinical trials, sapacitabine has demonstrated impressive results in delaying the spread of metastatic liver cancers in mice.

    From what I can gather from public sources (i.e., the NIH Clinical Trials Registry), there is one Phase 3 trial, which started recruiting patients in February of 2013 and is expected to be completed in late 2015. The trial is in elderly patients with AML, and compares alternating cycles of sapacitabine and decitabine with decitabine alone. Decitabine (Dacogen) is FDA-approved for treating AML and also targets cancer cells’ replication by attacking their DNA.

    It is possible that the Phase 3 trial by itself could lead to FDA approval for sapacitabine, depending on the strength of the results. However, that trial would not get the drug approved for use as monotherapy, since it is not being investigated as monotherapy. My guess is that Cyclacel is planning more trials of sapacitabine as monotherapy, perhaps in younger patients. And my further guess is that FDA approval is still quite a long way off.

    Sapacitabine is also in a Phase 3 trial with cyclophosphamide and rituximab for the treatment of relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Cyclophosphamide (marketed under several trade names) is a well-established chemotherapy agent used in a number of cancers, and has led to remission in many cases; however, it is associated with truly harrowing adverse effects. Rituximab (Rituxan, Genentech) is used not only in cancers but in some autoimmune diseases. And sapacitabine is also being studied in patients with previously-treated non-small-cell lung cancers.

    Although the piece from Biotech Supertrader said that the drug – identified as “drug S” –is also a promising treatment for ovarian cancer, I find no clue that it is being studied in such patients. [ed note: that’s because that “promise” is in the lab still, not in people — they had a press release about this in the Fall, “75% of Ovarian Cancer Patient Samples Highly Sensitive to Sapacitabine”, not studied in patients but on patient samples]

    Cyclacel has two other drugs in development: selicilib and a drug designated as CYC116. One selicilib study has been terminated, and in a second Phase 1 study, selicilib is used with sapacitabine in patients with advanced solid tumors. Remember, however, that Phase 1 studies are many rungs of the ladder below what’s needed to gain FDA approval.

    CYC116 is an aurora kinase inhibitor, meaning that it blocks the action of an intracellular enzyme that facilitates cancer cell mitosis. This is a promising avenue of cancer treatment, however, the traffic on this avenue is fairly heavy, and includes several other classes of drugs including tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and taxol based agents such as paclitaxel (Taxol, Bristol Myers Squibb); docetaxel (Taxotere, Sanofi-Aventis), Abraxane (a newer formulation of paclitaxel from Celgene) and others.

    CYC116 supposedly also inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which induces the growth of blood vessels that nourish cancer cells. Inhibiting VEGF is a well-established means of combating cancer, and CYC116 could hardly be characterized as a radically new departure in cancer treatment.

    The one trial involving this agent has been terminated. That, of course, does not mean that development of CYC116 stops dead in its tracks – there are many reasons why a trial can be terminated, and ours is not to speculate without more information.

    Beyond those three drugs, it’s hard to guess what Cyclacel may have up its corporate sleeve. It is certainly true that a successful cancer drug – even if only moderately successful– can be transformational for the biotech that develops the drug. But the drugs that Cyclacel has under development do not appear to this skeptical observer to be radically new departures in cancer treatment.

    It’s important to remember, when trying to estimate the likelihood of a single drug demonstrating sufficient efficacy and safety to gain FDA approval and market share, that the competitive field is vast. As I mentioned earlier, Cyclacel has a total of 8 clinical trials in process at this time.

    For the sake of perspective, it’s worth knowing that at present there are 41,445 cancer trials being conducted. So those are the odds.

So there you have it — it’s almost impossible to find a development-stage biotech whose financials look great or that makes your heart go pit-a-pat over their valuation, especially in a biotech bull market like we’ve seen over the past year or so, and Cyclacel doesn’t jump out as spectacular on that front either, not unless you’re a big believer in the promise of their specific drug. They’re a small stock and they don’t get much attention, other than from the analysts who probably helped them sell shares in secondary offerings in recent years, and there aren’t any major “skin in the game” insiders as far as I can tell (the CEO owns $1 million worth of shares, but he gets paid more than that every year), and there’s only one really focused owner on the institutional side that seems to have any kind of biotech focus (Eastern Capital owns about 7% of the shares, roughly $5 million worth … don’t know much about them).

So I don’t see a lot to make them stand out other than Robert Morris’ apparent enthusiasm for the shares (which certainly goes over the top, he calls his special report “The End of Cancer Worries Forever“), and I don’t know enough about the science to be a believer (though, to be fair, I almost never speculate on developmental biotechs because they’re so hit-driven and I’m not smart enough to be a hit-picker in the sector). It is at least encouraging that they are enrolling patients for Phase 3, and that they probably won’t have to raise more money before they have some indication of how the trial is going, but sometime in the next year or two they’re probably going to have to either get good results from this trial that let them raise cash at a good price, or have promising enough results that some big pharma company wants to jump in and help fund development of “drug S” (or just buy up the whole company, as happens with some regularity when a little biotech gets promising results).

Oh, and they are presenting at an investor conference next week, so maybe they’ll have something interesting to share then. As you can tell, this one doesn’t jump into my cup of tea … but these kinds of stocks almost never do. Sound interesting to you? Interested in the science or the lottery-ticket possibilities of $80-million developmental biotechs? Have any experience with Robert Morris or know whether or not we should consider him a biotech savant? Let us know with a comment below.



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DrKSSMDPhD
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karma swim swami

Cyclacel’s drug candidates are, mechanistically, decidedly “me too.” I see nothing particularly novel about any of its therapies, and, based on papers that they have published that I have read, their prospective agents are not exactly evoking barnstorming results. Sapacitabine will probably get approved, but it will not be pushing back the frontiers of oncology at all.

Douglas
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Sounds like a very interesting stock.

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professorredbag
Member
👍1

One should look at Provectus Biopharma (PVCT) if one wants a real gamechanger, investment-wise and medically. My first thought was the tease was for this company. It should have been.

DrKSSMDPhD
Guest
karmaswimswami

To William Tweedie: I reviewed Provectus. It went up by more than 100 per cent last month, but I cannot see on what basis. Its main drug candidate is the vital dye rose bengal. Thus far no mechanism by which it may help various tumors, including melanoma, has been reasonably postulated. There has been no hypothesizing even as to why a “bystander” effect may occur in melanoma. It has made it through phase I, which is no surprise. As I read the phase II data, I am troubled that no sham intralesional melanoma injections were done. How they will ever… Read More »

professorredbag
Member
👍1

I don’t believe in miracles but beneficial accidents do happen (possibly penicillin being the most well-known). An article mid-2013 in the NEJM or similar well respected publication (can’t recall at the moment, there have been many since such as in Oct issue of Cancer magazine) described how the drug was administered to solid cancer induced mice and the cancer disappeared and human compassionate cases (non FDA controlled) since with the same results. The FDA will publish the minutes of a special (type C) meeting with Provectus on the 15th wherein it is expected they will outline the options to approval… Read More »

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DrKSSMDPhD
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karmaswimswami

Hi: The article you are referring to appeared online in PLoS One, and pertained to a murine model of the disease. I researched Provectus further. It does seem they have a secure patent position on 10% w/v Rose Bengal solution. But I still have concerns, Mr Tweedie. The proposed mechanism of action is quasi-pyroptotic. The solution is locally instilled into cutaneous lesions. It is said to be taken up by cells, transported to lysosomes and lead to cell rupture, and the cell rupture is surmised to lead to an immune anti-melanoma response. There are problems with this theory, I feel.… Read More »

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William
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William

Pleased that I have evoked further research. Keep it up.
Of course, I’m always prepared to sell a stock. I, like most, am in the market to make a profit. It’s also pleasing when an investment is in a company with the potential to benefit mankind in a truly meaningful way but as a researcher I know to keep the emotion of one out of decisions in the other. Cheers.

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rugony
Member
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rugony

Dear biotech friends, please have a look at: http://www.bbbiotech.ch
super portfolio with a great discount, super managment, dividende ok, buy back progr.
BB BIOTECH (SIX), 1/8/2014 2:33 PM
Last:
CHF 145.70 Change: CHF +0.70 Volume: 7,880
Percent Change: +0.48 % Market cap: 1.73 bn
NAV: CHF 191.70 (Close 1/7/2014)

Solyom
Guest
Solyom

If CYCC gets above 4.50 per share in the next week, I predict it will be in a bullish trend of 3 months or more. Stop 4.10 for now.

joshsorensen
Member
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It took a nice jump once it crossed $4.50 today.

Solyom
Guest
Solyom

Right now SIX is in a consolidation phase If it got above 38 it might fulfill all of my criterion for a buy. For a stock in a long term bullish trend I usually am in 10% to late and out 10% also to late but capture the 80% in between. For PVCT I was in at 1 present stop is a 1.9. But at this moment I fulfills only 3 out of 4 of my criterion. if in a week closing price gets above 2.5 it will fulfill all four.

solyom (Osprey in Hungarian)

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finder0522
Member
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finder0522

The Irregular’s Take lists the stock as “CCYC” In reality it is “CYCC” – Must have been a pre-coffee entry 🙂

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Don Coon
Guest

It could be CYTR they have a new drug that may be game changing in the cancer field.

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Alan Harris
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Alan Harris

Yahoo offers me Cyclacel Pharmaceutical cycc @ 4.46 and cyccp @ 9.08. Wheres the difference?

Jo McIntyre
Guest

BB Biotech is trading on a number of European stock exchanges including its home exchange in Switzerland, but I can’t find an American stock market listing for the company.
http://www.bbbiotech.ch/en/bb-biotech/investor-relations/

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Bill O'Connell
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Bill O'Connell

A lesser know biotech that should be on everyone’s radr…SGMO. Their zinc finger study is progressing and has the potential. to be a game changer in HIV and several cancers.

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DrKSSMDPhD
Guest
karmaswimswami

Bill: I also think they are clever. The Zn-finger approach is to suppress T-lymphocyte expression of CCR5, the docking protein by which HIV enters the cell. But the company that may have a cleverer approach to that may be Calimmune. They are also going after CCR5, but by RNA silencing using a ddRNAi vector that could last rather a long time with one does. Sangamo is very smart, don’t get me wrong, but I think Calimmune may be cleverer, if not so well known. The ultimate cure for HIV would be stem cell transplantation with cells lacking CCR5, a la… Read More »

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Booya
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Booya

SGMO Trading at $23.75ish off a $19.61 close on the news below. Sangamo BioSciences announced the publication in the New England Journal of Medicine of the first clinical study of its proprietary zinc finger nuclease, or ZFN,-based genome editing technology in humans. Data from the study, carried out in HIV-positive subjects, demonstrate that the T-cell genome can be safely engineered to mimic a naturally occurring mutation that provides resistance to HIV infection. ZFN-modified T-cells are well tolerated when reinfused and treatment is associated with decreased viral loads, or VLs, in several subjects who were taken off their antiretroviral therapy, or… Read More »

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Victor Sperandeo
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Victor Sperandeo

Don’t listen to karmaswimswami and William Tweedie, do your own homework! “me too drug”? Tell that to the deadly disease RMDS and AML cancer patients who are living longer on sapa, some of them are alive for 2-3 years already – they keep taking sapa and they keep living. AML phase 3 is ongoing and RMDS ph.2 final data out in December On December 9, 2013 Cyclacel reported ph 2 RMDS results The median overall survival for all three arms is approximately 8.6 months. Ten patients (approximately 16%) are still alive. “We are very interested in novel treatment options for… Read More »

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DrKSSMDPhD
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karmaswimswami

In the biotech pharma world, I have to say I am just shocked that the FDA has approved another SGLT-2 inhibitor, a “flozin,” today. These drugs work by poisoning the glucose/sodium co-transporter in the renal tubule and causing glucose to spill in the urine. That the FDA would approve such a strategy for managing diabetes is disturbing. These drugs have no long-term safety record, and there is every reason to fear that they will hasten renal damage from diabetes, lead to urinary tract infections, and promote tumors of the urinary system. The drug approved today is by Astra Zeneca. It… Read More »

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DrKSSMDPhD
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karmaswimswami

Yes, Victor Sperandeo, I know Kantarjian quite well. And there is no reason for you to go all ad hominem, At best, sapacitabine is extending survival by only 4 months. It cures no one. It has extraordinary toxicity. It is a nucleoside analog, and these are a dime a dozen. Quizartinib and midostaurin are far more promising for elderly AML patients. In AML patients treated with sapacitabine, nearly 10 per cent of them had deaths attributable to the drug! The 2013 MDS study reported only a 19 per cent response rate to sapacitabine. A “game changer”? No, It is certainly… Read More »

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truthseeker
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truthseeker

Karmaswami, you have a source for your assertion that sapacitabine has extraordinary toxiicity? And how do you account for all of the extended lives reported in the studies that exceed “four months”? Besides, what is four more months of life worth?

Victor Sperandeo
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Victor Sperandeo

Hi, karmaswimswami. Sorry for the ad hominem. Very good that you have a medical background and know Dr. Kantarjian quite well – your time would be much better spent discussing the medical side of sapacitabine with him, rather than with me. My background is in applied mathematics and statistics, rather than medicine, but it is very useful in spotting shortcuts and shenanigans those biotech companies use in clinical trials. The most important thing is that you think that despite all the shortcomings, sapacitabine is likely to be approved. It is not a cure for cancer, but a cure is not… Read More »

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DrKSSMDPhD
Guest
karmaswimswami

Trader Vic: Thank you for your reply. Neither quizartinib nor midostaurin are nucleoside analogs. Both are tyrosine kinase inhibitors, the former for the TK encoded by FLT. FLT+ AML is a common problem in the elderly and bodes poor prognosis. My suspicion is that both will be approved, as phase II efficacy and toxicity have been quite favorable and they represent a new approach to AML, a disease with a bad prognosis. I consider sapacitrabine “me too” because it will simply join the ranks of other nucleoside analogs: fluorouracil, fludarabine, cytarabine, gemcitabine, capecitabine,, 6-MP, and a dozen others. All of… Read More »

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George
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George

A perspective comment: When evaluating cancer drugs, a true breakthrough drug will be on the market based on Phase 2b results due to very strong clinical benefit. Drugs that require two pivotal Phase 3 trials may very well be better than current options, generate significant revenue and result in big pharma buyouts, but the truly special ones will be not require a pivotal phase 3 before marketing. An intermediate class are those that are marketed based on a pivotal 2b and 3 trials instead of two phase 3 trials: faster and cheaper to market. The same can be said of… Read More »

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MARINE
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MARINE

No idea how I stumbled onto this but started reading. Here is what I found: http://californiastemcellreport.blogspot.com/search?q=Calimmune BTW, I know nothing about any of this just read the feedback above and started poking around the net. Read down and you will come to an article dated: Wednesday, November 11, 2009. Did a search on Grayhawk Capital in AZ. Guess who they invest in? CELLZDIRECT and CELLZDIRECT was acquired by Invitrogen, which is now Life Tecnologies. LIFE TICKER. Not sure if this will be the stock to invest in but just reading the first story sounds like David Baltimore who founded Calimmune… Read More »

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DrKSSMDPhD
Guest
karmaswimswami

Marine: Sorry to hear about your job. As regards D. Baltimore, I feel media have really unfairly tarred him. There is no evidence whatsoever that he committed any sort of fraud. He stood by a researcher in his lab who was accused of fraud, deemed guilty of fraud in a media and investigative frenzy, and the ultimately exonerated. This was the case of T. Imanishi-Kari. She did nothing wrong and her accusers were roundly discredited. There was a subsequent case, a researcher named van Parijs who was found to have committed fraud on multiple occasions in multiple positions, including when… Read More »

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JJ
Guest
JJ

When I stumbled across this articile I thought they were talking about Gradalis (incidentially the word means ‘towards the Holy Grail’). They too are using ddRNAi to treat many forms of advanced cancer and are about to initiate PIII. They are yet to take a licence from Benitec, but will surely need to soon or face the realities of not doing so. Gradalis are private company so you cannot invest, but Benitec is a potential gold mine. Compare what they have with similar biotechs in the US and you will find that they are trading at 1/10th of the value.… Read More »

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DrKSSMDPhD
Guest
karmaswimswami

JJ: Thanks for your comment. You are quite right about M. Graham. The specific guy who designed TT-034 with its three shRNA casettes is David Suhy, plucked from Tacere to Benitec. This month, 14 patients at both UCSD and Duke with genotype 1 HCV that have failed customary antiviral treatment will be dosed with TT-034. If virus burden falls at all by 30 days (and based on work in animal models it will), I see Benitec appreciating like crazy. The company also has a ddRNAsh trial for NSCLC, directed against tumor-expressed tubulin. They have very smart management in place, and… Read More »

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biocqr
Member
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biocqr

Karma, you stated “Benitec is tiny ($50 million market cap), ”
Are you sure that is correct?

On page 35 of Benitec’s 2013 annual report it states…
“At the end of the financial year, there were 439,857,844 unissued ordinary shares (2012: 428,985,202) over which options were outstanding”
http://www.benitec.com/documents/BLTAnnualreport2013.pdf

There’s also 89,609,248 ordinary shares outstanding so on a fully diluted basis that’s 518M shares which gives BNIKF a mc of $337M.

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JJ
Guest
JJ

Hi William, there are currently 85,156,527 shares on issue. There was a 25/1 share consolidation last year and also new shares issued. At their current price of 76.5 cents, their market cap is 65,144,743. This is the information on the ASX:BLT Aussie market of course. I don’t understand the market cap they list on the OTC market as listed on Yahoo Finance. It looks out to me. Anyway, the earlier info I gave you should be correct.

JJ
Guest
JJ

Just to clarify, that is $AUD65,144,743 .

biocqr
Member
👍2
biocqr

JJ,

As of Nov 12, 2013 the options on issue were 19,797,734 so add that to the shares outstanding… for a total of 104,953,861 fully diluted shares.

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JJ
Guest
JJ

sorry William, I just saw some other replies regarding options. The closest lot of options listed as BLTO have a strike price of $2.50 at the end of April 2014. If it hits that, I will be pretty darn happy, and the dilution really won’t worry most early investors. Besides, it will provide a much needed cash injection preventing a further capital raising.

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Jim
Guest
Jim

Look at ARWR they are the one that have a better way administer the drug into the cancer cells

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Brian
Guest

Thanks to all for your input and to Gumshoe. Perhaps someone knows about Cardiome Pharma Corp.(TSE:COM). I made a small investment on them when they crashed early 2012 and then nibbled again near the bottom. In August they headed sharply up and continue to step their way higher. If they can return to their 2010 high near $40, I’d be happy.

DrKSSMDPhD
Guest
karmaswimswami

I am semi-familiar with them. Vernakalant is being sold in the EU for a.fib. but seems hopelessly stalled on FDA approval here. The recent rise must owe to the acquisition of the Swiss company selling tirofiban (Aggrastat), a glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor. It’s unclear what is appealing about that drug. It’s an old category of medication, and offers nothing new. Unless there are things in development that they are not revealing, I just see it being stalled here indefinitely without any catalyst for appreciation. If you bought in early 2012 and at the nadir, your average basis may equal where it… Read More »

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Brian
Guest

Thanks for the info. I considered selling when it first popped over $5 but it’s a very small amount so I figured I’d just let it ride. Plus, my combined price is about $2.80 so I plan to sell if it stalls for a long period or plunges. It’s up nearly 20% is the past 3 days, now pushing $8. That’s up 60% in 3 months so I can’t imagine doing better elsewhere with my knowledge of the sector.

Gregory Ruffa
Guest
Gregory Ruffa

I am interested in the NEW Technologies, coming on Nuclear Energy Generation,
Computer Technologies and New Drugs that have US Approvals.

raven
Member
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