“This Tiny, Unknown Biotech is About to Unleash Its ‘Holy Grail’ Drug”

Biotech Supertrader teases that "This May be the Most Radical Advance in Medicine in the Last 100 Years"

By Travis Johnson, Stock Gumshoe, January 8, 2014

Robert Morris is helming a biotech-focused stock newsletter that’s called Biotech Supertrader (modesty has no place in the world of newsletter promotions, of course), and I’ve never covered this letter before so I thought I ought to have a look at the latest teaser we’ve been asked about.

Morris, incidentally, has been featured in our pages before — but that was back when he was editor of China Stock Insider at the same publisher. That letter, like almost all China-focused investment newsletters, seems to have disappeared quietly into that good night … which probably tells you that it’s time to invest in China again, since the newsletter publishers are ignoring the Middle Kingdom and rushing out their pitches about biotech and tech stocks. At the time, Morris was teasing NQ Mobile (NQ), which has turned out to be pretty good if you bought it down there in the $6-8 neighborhood (though it’s been a wild ride).

So now what’s he pitching for his Biotech Supertrader?

Well, the destruction of “Man’s deadliest disease”, of course. Here’s how the teaser gets our attention:

“This Tiny, Unknown Biotech is About to Unleash Its ‘Holy Grail’ Drug on Man’s Deadliest Disease

“Their ‘Guided Missile Approach’ Could Save Thousands of Lives Each Year

“It’s about to become the most talked about advancement in cancer treatment in our lifetimes and you can lock in a life-transforming fortune if you act quickly….

“I’m urging my subscribers to load up on this stock NOW….

“I’ve just uncovered a tiny, unknown biotechnology company with a new cancer drug in phase 3 clinical trials which is showing remarkable success at treating several types of cancer.

“Their scientists have found an innovative approach to cancer care which involves a breakthrough in treatment. It goes deep inside the inner workings of our cells.

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“Plus, this medicine looks to be many times more effective and with fewer side effects than the chemo, radiation, and drug therapies currently available.”

If there’s one thing that investors know can make them rich and make them feel good about themselves and the world, it’s a cure for cancer — we’ve seen that effective cancer treatments can and do (occasionally) turn little biotech stocks into gigantic successes, so the dream lives on that you’re going to catch one of these lottery tickets and own the next Genentech. Will we be so lucky? Well, let’s see which one he’s pitching:

“When this drug wins FDA approval – which I believe it will – this small company’s $4.16 stock price will go straight to the moon.

“And the market for this drug is absolutely huge!

“You see, this small biotech is targeting its new drug, let’s call it ‘drug S’, at cancers of the blood and bone marrow. And it is already in very promising phase 3 trials for these two types of cancer.

“But here’s where it gets really interesting. It looks like the drug this company is developing will also work on other types of cancer!

“There are positive signs it works on Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) too. There are 1.1 million people with this type of malignancy. Just in the United States alone there are over 300,000 patients with this disease according to The American Cancer Society. Each desperate for a cure.

“Plus it looks like ‘drug S’ may turn out to be an effective treatment for ovarian Cancer. There are more than 204,000 new cases of ovarian cancer diagnosed worldwide each year with 22,280 of these in the United States according to the National Cancer Institute estimates.”

So … who is it? Thinkolator sez this is Cyclacel Pharmaceuticals (CYCC)

Cyclacel is indeed a little biotech around $4 (it closed at $4.35 yesterday), with a market capitalization of only about $80 million — so be careful, we’re a big enough group here that if just a small percentage of Stock Gumshoe readers got enthused about this stock it could drive the shares up, less than a million dollars worth of shares trade each day (Biotech Supertrader says they limited their readership to 750 people — I don’t know if that’s still their cap or if they’ve hit it, but we’ll have more folks than that reading this free article).

And like many biotech stocks, it’s got some impressive scientists and it’s been losing money for a long time as they’ve been searching for a viable drug (their current lead drug also was a big focus of theirs back when it was in Phase 1 trials five or more years ago, so that’s a good reminder of the time these things take, it’s just starting Phase 3 trials now). It looks like they must have gone public in 2004, when they were about eight years old, and a quick scan of ten years of their financials over at Morningstar indicates that they’ve never generated more than a token amount of revenue (meaning, they’ve probably had some research collaboration payments or partnership funding, but never got a product to market), and have accumulated more than $250 million in losses to date. And had two reverse splits to keep the price from sinking far into penny territory.

So that’s not unusual, but it means that — as with all developmental-stage biotechs — it’s not about the financials or the fundamentals, it’s about what’s going to happen in their clinical trials and whether things are going well enough that they can continue to finance the trials … which get much more expensive as you progress through Phase 2 and Phase 3.

All I know about them so far is that they say they’ve got enough cash to get through enrollment in their key Phase 3 study for “drug S” (which is sapacitabine) as of September when they last updated their investor presentation, but I know nothing about the science or the competing cancer drugs that are out there or how fabulous this particular one might be, so I asked our favorite medical writer, Doc Gumshoe (who, yes, is not a doctor) to check them out quickly and chime in. Here’s what he could share after looking into them for a few minutes (he’s just looking at the medical stuff, not so much the “investor presentations”):

    Cyclacel’s Prospects

    Cyclacel has three drugs in development at this time, and is involved in eight clinical trials with these drugs, not including two clinical trials that have been terminated. Their top contender is sapacitabine which targets the division of cancer cells. If you can prevent cancer cells from dividing and reproducing, you have the cancer whipped, so targeting cancer cell division (or mitosis, which is the technical term) is a highly promising avenue for treating cancer. However, we need to take note of the fact that sapacitabine is one of a large number of drugs that propose to fight cancer by this method.

    At present, all eight of Cyclacel’s clinical trials involve sapacitabine. Of these, at least one has been completed – a Phase 1 study of the safety and pharmacology of the drug. Four others are current, with no information about results. These are likely Phase 1 or small Phase 2 studies, to assess safety, determine what a correct dose might be, and evaluate whether the drug does what it’s supposed to do in human subjects with the target diseases, which in this case include acute myeloid leukemia (AML), cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, and some advanced solid tumors. Prior to the clinical trials, sapacitabine has demonstrated impressive results in delaying the spread of metastatic liver cancers in mice.

    From what I can gather from public sources (i.e., the NIH Clinical Trials Registry), there is one Phase 3 trial, which started recruiting patients in February of 2013 and is expected to be completed in late 2015. The trial is in elderly patients with AML, and compares alternating cycles of sapacitabine and decitabine with decitabine alone. Decitabine (Dacogen) is FDA-approved for treating AML and also targets cancer cells’ replication by attacking their DNA.

    It is possible that the Phase 3 trial by itself could lead to FDA approval for sapacitabine, depending on the strength of the results. However, that trial would not get the drug approved for use as monotherapy, since it is not being investigated as monotherapy. My guess is that Cyclacel is planning more trials of sapacitabine as monotherapy, perhaps in younger patients. And my further guess is that FDA approval is still quite a long way off.

    Sapacitabine is also in a Phase 3 trial with cyclophosphamide and rituximab for the treatment of relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Cyclophosphamide (marketed under several trade names) is a well-established chemotherapy agent used in a number of cancers, and has led to remission in many cases; however, it is associated with truly harrowing adverse effects. Rituximab (Rituxan, Genentech) is used not only in cancers but in some autoimmune diseases. And sapacitabine is also being studied in patients with previously-treated non-small-cell lung cancers.

    Although the piece from Biotech Supertrader said that the drug – identified as “drug S” –is also a promising treatment for ovarian cancer, I find no clue that it is being studied in such patients. [ed note: that’s because that “promise” is in the lab still, not in people — they had a press release about this in the Fall, “75% of Ovarian Cancer Patient Samples Highly Sensitive to Sapacitabine”, not studied in patients but on patient samples]

    Cyclacel has two other drugs in development: selicilib and a drug designated as CYC116. One selicilib study has been terminated, and in a second Phase 1 study, selicilib is used with sapacitabine in patients with advanced solid tumors. Remember, however, that Phase 1 studies are many rungs of the ladder below what’s needed to gain FDA approval.

    CYC116 is an aurora kinase inhibitor, meaning that it blocks the action of an intracellular enzyme that facilitates cancer cell mitosis. This is a promising avenue of cancer treatment, however, the traffic on this avenue is fairly heavy, and includes several other classes of drugs including tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and taxol based agents such as paclitaxel (Taxol, Bristol Myers Squibb); docetaxel (Taxotere, Sanofi-Aventis), Abraxane (a newer formulation of paclitaxel from Celgene) and others.

    CYC116 supposedly also inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which induces the growth of blood vessels that nourish cancer cells. Inhibiting VEGF is a well-established means of combating cancer, and CYC116 could hardly be characterized as a radically new departure in cancer treatment.

    The one trial involving this agent has been terminated. That, of course, does not mean that development of CYC116 stops dead in its tracks – there are many reasons why a trial can be terminated, and ours is not to speculate without more information.

    Beyond those three drugs, it’s hard to guess what Cyclacel may have up its corporate sleeve. It is certainly true that a successful cancer drug – even if only moderately successful– can be transformational for the biotech that develops the drug. But the drugs that Cyclacel has under development do not appear to this skeptical observer to be radically new departures in cancer treatment.

    It’s important to remember, when trying to estimate the likelihood of a single drug demonstrating sufficient efficacy and safety to gain FDA approval and market share, that the competitive field is vast. As I mentioned earlier, Cyclacel has a total of 8 clinical trials in process at this time.

    For the sake of perspective, it’s worth knowing that at present there are 41,445 cancer trials being conducted. So those are the odds.

So there you have it — it’s almost impossible to find a development-stage biotech whose financials look great or that makes your heart go pit-a-pat over their valuation, especially in a biotech bull market like we’ve seen over the past year or so, and Cyclacel doesn’t jump out as spectacular on that front either, not unless you’re a big believer in the promise of their specific drug. They’re a small stock and they don’t get much attention, other than from the analysts who probably helped them sell shares in secondary offerings in recent years, and there aren’t any major “skin in the game” insiders as far as I can tell (the CEO owns $1 million worth of shares, but he gets paid more than that every year), and there’s only one really focused owner on the institutional side that seems to have any kind of biotech focus (Eastern Capital owns about 7% of the shares, roughly $5 million worth … don’t know much about them).

So I don’t see a lot to make them stand out other than Robert Morris’ apparent enthusiasm for the shares (which certainly goes over the top, he calls his special report “The End of Cancer Worries Forever“), and I don’t know enough about the science to be a believer (though, to be fair, I almost never speculate on developmental biotechs because they’re so hit-driven and I’m not smart enough to be a hit-picker in the sector). It is at least encouraging that they are enrolling patients for Phase 3, and that they probably won’t have to raise more money before they have some indication of how the trial is going, but sometime in the next year or two they’re probably going to have to either get good results from this trial that let them raise cash at a good price, or have promising enough results that some big pharma company wants to jump in and help fund development of “drug S” (or just buy up the whole company, as happens with some regularity when a little biotech gets promising results).

Oh, and they are presenting at an investor conference next week, so maybe they’ll have something interesting to share then. As you can tell, this one doesn’t jump into my cup of tea … but these kinds of stocks almost never do. Sound interesting to you? Interested in the science or the lottery-ticket possibilities of $80-million developmental biotechs? Have any experience with Robert Morris or know whether or not we should consider him a biotech savant? Let us know with a comment below.


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Alan Harris
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Alan Harris

Nothing to do with this mainstream thread so entirely off topic….but one or two have asked about my music biz remenicences. See GS discussions area re Music biz….nothing to do with investing. Bye

Alan Harris
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Alan Harris

Sorry, its hard to find on the site, so heres the www

http://www.stockgumshoe.com/2014/01/microblog-music-biz-nothing-to-do-with-investing/

DrKSSMDPhD
Guest
karmaswimswami

Halozyme is an intriguing, maybe a vexing, situation. A director bought 100,000 shares last August, but execs are not buying. I do believe in following these insider movements. A few years ago, there was an interesting company called Inspire Therapeutics that was making products for dry eye, keratoconjunctiviitis sicca. Frankly, the science did not impress me. It wasn’t bad science, it was just so-what science on a non-life threatening disease. An exec got loans to buy, no kidding, $40 million worth of shares, and that is when and why I bought. At the time it was the SEC’s largest insider… Read more »

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George
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George

The insiders already own a huge amount, so I don’t expect much buying outside of the new CEO. The modification of the pancreatic cancer ECM (extra-cellular matrix) is just a useful sidelight of the platform, not its primary use. However, it could drive significant sales, if it allows the current agents to work in pancreatic. Intratumoral concentrations of cancer drugs and the immune response are shockingly low due to the ECM. The drug work well ex-vivo (they kill the tumor cells), it is just the ability to get them into the cells. Outside of pancreatic, ECM modification isn’t much of… Read more »

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DrKSSMDPhD
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karmaswimswami

To Don Barrett: Believe it or not, I invested in the early 90’s in the company that developed the green-laser prostate ablative technique. I am momentarily blanking on its name. At the time, the studies of it had absolutely brilliant results. Excellent symptomatic relief of the symptoms of prostatism, which can really quite literally drive sufferers mad from sleep deprivation owing to nocturia, but with so much less carnage than TURP. At the time, Medicare decided NOT to cover it for reasons I did not understand and that stunned everyone. I am not sure which company owns this tech now.… Read more »

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Don Barrett
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Don Barrett

How does one thank someone for peace of mind. Alas, a heartfelt thank you will have to suffice.

Don

jamespaul108
Irregular
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jamespaul108

from http://www.lef.org: “Writing in an article published online on October 5, 2012 in the journal Carcinogenesis, German and Italian researchers report an anti-metastatic effect for curcumin, a compound that occurs in the spice turmeric, in an animal model of prostate cancer. “Previous experimentation by the team uncovered an inhibitory effect for curcumin against the expression of pro-inflammatory immunomodulator cytokines that include CXCL1 and CXCL2, which are associated with breast cancer metastases. The current research found a similar inhibitory action for curcumin in prostate carcinoma cells via inhibition of nuclear factor kappa-beta (NFkB). Upon testing curcumin in a mouse model of… Read more »

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Don Barrett
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Don Barrett

Dr. Karmaswimswami,

I had my Green Light Laser on January 30, but am still taking Uribel for the burning. Will I have to take this for life; will it get better?
If there are things I should know, I am happy to reimburse you for a phone consult.
Sorry list for being way off topic, but I am troubled and am desperate for advice I can truly trust.

Don Barrett

Alan Harris
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Alan Harris

Don, I (we all) feel for you and thank God we dont feel like you. Can I suggest yu repost this to front of queue coz its likely to get overlooked otherwise.
I (we) all wish you well.

don Barrett
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don Barrett

Thank you Alan; will do. Very kind of you.

Don

sivapann
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👍4
sivapann

Is anyone following GeoVax’s HIV vaccine? I’m not a doctor or scientist and hence not able to validate its science. I see that Steve mentioned it above and ‘GOVX’ announced publication of Phase 2a results. The PR mentions excellent safety profile but nothing about efficacy.
http://seekingalpha.com/pr/8745921-geovax-announces-publication-of-phase-2a-clinical-trial-in-the-journal-of-infectious-diseases
Here is the abstract – http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24403557

Any thought on this will be much appreciated

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George
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George

The study was short term in healthy adults… so no efficacy can be had. It is purely an immunogenicity trial and a proof of principle one at that. I like the dual DNA – viral vector combo for establishing a balanced (CD8 and Ab) response… it also helps durability (how long it will last). That said, intramuscular injection of DNA doesnt work very well…. needs an adjuvant or a better DNA delivery system (ie electroporation) One does not expect any safety issues in this type of trial (out side of local injection site reactions). The CD8s are what you are… Read more »

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DrKSSMDPhD
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karmaswimswami

Siva: someone, maybe it was you, asked about it earlier and I meant to answer. All of these HIV vaccine development stories are very dicey. For every industry-sponsored effort, there are also several academic efforts. All have failed for 20 years, again and again. In HIV vaccination, there are two prongs, therapeutic and preventive. For therapeutic, the goal is to give it to infected people in order to lessen their requirements for ART drugs, which are quite dear. For preventive vaccines, those are tricky to test because obviously you cannot willingly expose people to HIV. Those trials have been done… Read more »

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siva
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siva

Thanks DR. KSS for thoughtful comments.

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sivapann
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sivapann

TO Travis Johnson, Stock Gumshoe:

Thanks Travis for allowing us to have a conversation here and I really appreciate it.
One request I have is if its possible to display the comments in the reverse order ie display newer comments at the top in the descending order.

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Alan Harris
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Alan Harris

I used to think the same, but anyone new, loses context as they are forced to read the thread backwards. Siva, its easy enough to hit the ‘end’ button on your keyboard to get to the latest entries. But it would be good if the link on the notification email linked to that particular question/reply rather than top of thread, as sometimes finding it in a thread this size is needle in a haystack IMO.

tanglewood
Irregular
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Alan; re finding replies, if you have a keyword that’s not referenced in the blog too often, go to Chrome menu and hit ‘Find’ and the down arrow will take you to each reference.

Alan Harris
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Alan Harris

Thanks and probably true (although it took time to find ur reply!) Theres always a work around, but how much simpler if the link took you there directly. Lazy software.

donsc
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👍1
donsc

Thanks

sfimar
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👍149
sfimar

I was thinking about PVCT but then I read Mr. karmaswimswami´s post about it and decided not to buy and cancelled my “low ball” order….THANK YOU!!! It is 64% down in one day…wow… I am kind of late to the Biotech party myself…I have been lucky with GALE, NVAX, CVM…cannt complain with my +17% since I bought Benitec as per Mr. karmaswimswami recomendation… Let me say it once again…thank you for sharing your knowledge and taking your time to answer all the questions and comments here, it is amazing to see somebody offering something so valuable for free and expecting… Read more »

ockrazor
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ockrazor

Good Morning. I got the ability to trade international stocks ” turn on” for my fidelity account and almost pulled the trigger last night in Aus. I figured I would just buy here in the states this AM. Travis I know you said you liked to buy in the native country but I am thinking the US shouldn’t be that much of a differnce or arb would be huge so I will buy here unless you or Derek think there is a huge difference. Dr.KSS I went thru this all the post yesterday again. My head still hurts and I… Read more »

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Derek
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Depends on your trade size. If it’s a small trade, the $9.95 per trade type, then you might be better off trading over here in the US market. If you are trading in size I believe it’s better to deal through the international desk where you have more control setting parameters for the trade but that may cost up to $100 per trade. I don’t know about Fidelity’s cost requirements.

Alan Harris
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Alan Harris

I still think you run the danger if the stock goes tits up, that you wont be able to set a meaningful stop loss for US till after Oz shuts….then theres hell to pay.

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ockrazor
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ockrazor

Thanks. The currency conversion is a pain so prob just buy here

greenfire67
Irregular
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Dr.KSS makes a great point, BNIKF is overbought. Just need to stress how important it is to be patient. Once a market maker sees the potential for a momo stock, it sets presitence for the MM to “gouge” the investing public. If we all lowball our orders, and give it a little time, say 2 to 3 weeks, MM will be more inclined to let shares go for a reasonable price. But when presidence is already set, MM will always try to get all he can from US. So lets all set orders in the 40 – 50 cent range.… Read more »

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Alan Harris
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Alan Harris

Anyone suffering from Migraine? Saw this yesterday and thought of you. No pills just a magnet!!..not sure if its investable or can be used for tinnitus.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/8547042.stm

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DrKSSMDPhD
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karmaswimswami

To Alan Harris: You could be right about BNIKF versus BLT shares, but my feeling is that BNIKF price action now dictates BLT price action, not vice versa. The company want it that way. Lots of Australian analysts view the market there are roundly beaten down. This is why Benitec decided to do the TT-034 HCV study in the US and not Down Under, to move the share price here.

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Alan Harris
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Alan Harris

So, any ‘bad news’ will break in US b4 Oz? Fair enough. If thats the case, its certainly safer buying BNIKF.

Alan Harris
Guest
Alan Harris

Strange that BLT rose n % before BINKF responded next day.

Andre Blanchet
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Andre Blanchet

Has anyone else noticed that the markets had a correction today?

Andre Blanchet
Guest
Andre Blanchet

15,997.?????? Wow!!! I’m not educated in this industry but I know that’s not good. I guess it not horrible for the markets to fluctuate but -200! It was up to like 16,500

DrKSSMDPhD
Guest
karmaswimswami

To Leo S: I figured you meant 24 ng/mL. That really is quite low. If you review the vitamin D toxicity data, and believe me I have, there just basically isn’t a toxicity state from it. We were all taught in medical school that A,D, E, and K are fat soluble vitamins and that therefore people should be careful with those because they get stored and one could overdose. And that is true for vitamin A and for vitamin E. But despite fat solubility, the body will retain at most about 1 mg vitamin K at a time, no matter… Read more »

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Leo S
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Leo S

Dr. Karma, And thank you again.

Andre Blanchet
Guest
Andre Blanchet

If heard that vitamin D deficiencies are the leading cause of cancer and Alzheimer’s and lots of other ailments! Dr Karma , have you ever heard of Ecklonia Kava? It’s supposed to be the most powerful antioxidant on earth! Why don’t the scientist and companies go after the oxidation of the minerals in the cells, which is the main cause of all disease in mammals! Oxidation of minerals is called “rust” by most people, so, why do the pharmaceuticals and investors and scientists go after cell division when it comes to cancer Alzheimer’s and other degenerative disorders. It’s understandable when… Read more »

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Brian Close
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Brian Close

To Leo S. and Dr K. Right on the mark again Dr K, this time regarding fat soluble vitamins! There may some merit Leo, in using D3 only, while you experiment with dosage levels until you get results. Vitamin D3 is water soluble, so there is absolutely no fear of toxicity. I have been taking 10,000 IU/day of D3 all this year, for immune support. The first time you mentioned vitamin D, you wrote D3, and thereafter you wrote just vitamin D. Looks innocent, but that’s the whole difference between fat soluble and water soluble! I have taken over 10,000… Read more »

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Leo S
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Leo S

Brian, Yes, I studied D2/D3 before I started taking D3. Thank you.

jamespaul108
Irregular
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jamespaul108

I don’t know if it’s true, but there are multiple articles on the internet stating that increased consumption of Vitamin D increases the need for magnesium and Vitamin A. Somewhere I read that prolonged consumption of large amount of Vitamin D resulted in symptoms of Vitamin A deficiency, even though Vitamin A was consumed or produced in normal amounts. Here are a couple examples of articles.
http://blog.cholesterol-and-health.com/2009/04/tufts-university-confirms-that-vitamin.html
http://jdmoyer.com/2011/01/12/how-and-why-to-balance-fat-soluble-vitamins/

DrKSSMDPhD
Guest
karmaswimswami

Siva: You raised some good issues about Provectus. That company might be worth reviewing here a little. For those who do not know about Provectus, it is a Knoxville, TN, company doing clinical trials with a dye, Rose Bengal, used heretofore for cytology work in labs and sometimes by ophthalmologists. Somehow, not sure how, they have managed to patent this pennies-a-serving age-old compound, and are now making sweeping claims about it having efficacy for treating melanoma and psoriasis. The former is what has gotten the most attention. Melanoma is a skin cancer of extraordinary metastatic potential. The stock has been… Read more »

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Alan Harris
Guest
Alan Harris

Your anti posts often make me LOL. Mostly I havent got the foggiest idea about the science …..but you give every indication that YOU do and thats good enough for me. THAT’S why we trust you Swammi. You know your onions.

sean connery
Guest
sean connery

Well Said.

Alan Harris
Guest
Alan Harris

As said above….I know B all about the science. I suspect that 99.997% of others here know little more than me. It would take us a lifetime to get to where you are, so ANY DD we do is practically useless. At best its re-inventing the wheel…. square. We’ve all suggested that you write a blog/offer a tip sheet……theres a queue at your door. As with most share dealing, it comes to this…..do you trust this person? Lets cut to the chase. Myron feeds us mining etc tips (an almost unmanageably HUGE amount). I know zero about mining…..but I trust… Read more »

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sivapann
Member
👍4
sivapann

Thank you Dr. KSS. I read a chemist’s blog somewhere that mentions when you remove impurities in a dye(I know I’m not using the medical parlance here) it has medicinal value. I cant find that link now.

Here is a Life science’s report where Culpepper describes how Rose Bengal and autolysis is used as a cancer therapeutic http://www.thelifesciencesreport.com/pub/na/provectus-pharmaceuticals-inc-and-pv-10-rose-bengal-as-a-novel-cancer-therapeutic

I also found an anonymous blogger who seems like invested his life on PVCT:
http://provectuspharmaceuticalsinc.blogspot.com/
http://provectuspharmaceuticalsinc.blogspot.com/p/about-blogger.html
http://provectuspharmaceuticalsinc.blogspot.com/2014/01/provectus-biopharmaceuticals-worth-of.html

I have not invested in PVCT, but made a quick 50% playing the bounce last week. I like AF this instance.

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biocqr
Member
👍2
biocqr

Red flag #1: Provectus only has 4 employees
Red flag #2: they each haul in >$1M in salary
Red flag #3: no institutional ownership to speak of…only .026%… no biotech funds own PVCT

PVCT is a sham.

Warner
Guest

I can not validate this info except to say in 2012 they had SG&A expenses of $13,613,000 compared to $48,000 for R&D with no revenues (per TDA). Sure smells like a crushed stink bug to me.

Alan Harris
Guest
Alan Harris

Good post !! Thanx

microcapwiz
Guest
microcapwiz

trlpf and tltff have the biggest upside in the biotech space.

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roblites
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roblites

While the PVCT discussion has been going on, Thurs about 11AM Adam Feuerstein