Curzio Venture Opportunities

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STEVE STRAZZA
STEVE STRAZZA
3 years ago

what about the dna sequencing firm he was teasing about as his second recommendation… i think it is syros pharma

Stacey
2 years ago

Overall, I’ve done well with Frank since he moved away from Phase One days. Over the past 6 months, one big loss, one big gain, but the remaining portfolio is up overall. Gold recs overall down, biotech recs up.

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MarcS
MarcS
1 year ago

This is one of those newsletters that’s advertised as $5,000 a year but is always on sales. (Same for Katusa and others) The actual price at the time of writing is $3,000 for two years. And when you sign up, you’ll be offered a lifetime offer that you need to accept now or lose, for an additional $2,000. (They will probably offer it to you later by email if you don’t take it) That’s a $5,000 total. And if you sign for lifetime, you will be paying a $200 fee a year (starting the second year) for “maintenance”, so you’re never quite done paying.

The advertising is misleading in many ways. Frank claims the newsletter is $5,000 a year, or $10,000 for two years. Therefore, the current deal is 70% off! That’s only true of if anyone, ever paid 5,000$ a year, which is doubtful. Also, the ad lists various great picks, some of which I believe were not in CVO but in a previous mailing list Curzio ran. It’s probably text written at the launch of the newsletter. You’ll note things like listing JC Penny as a stock that gained “29% in two months”. That stock was actually stopped out at a lost, as far as I know. (also, not clear was JCP was doing in this newsletter – imagine paying hundreds for that monthly pick).

This newsletter was launched in a resource bear market and got off to a terrible start. The first pick, USAU, was apparently a pump and dump scheme Frank got also fooled by. Then, other “good” picks like GSV just went down continually. The “Venture” in the title suggests it’s focused on resource stocks, but Frank has had to change direction and diversify into pharma, defense, semiconductors, oil, etc. You get one pdf with one pick a month, so you’re paying a lot of these in the first years.

CVO also offers occasional (2 or 3 times a year) private placement opportunities (for example in a gold company, Revival Gold) but I’ve never taken them, without regrets. For the gold placements, the stocks went lower and the bonus warrants will expire worthless, afaik.

Two years later now, I’ve booked thousands of dollars of loses on some of the positions, but many MORE thousands of gains on others. Take for example of the 2016 bio picks, NVTA. I’ve made $35,000 on that one alone to date, although I magnified my gains with judicious use of call options on a pullback that Frank believed was temporary. There are many 50% to 300% winners. And there are losers. But the winners outweigh the losers.

This is a newsletter that requires a lot of capital, risk management, and good trader psychology to handle the losers. Don’t add to losing position. Don’t try to salvage a lost on a position that’s been stopped out, just get it off your screen and forget it. Don’t risk more than you can afford to lose without losing sleep. I would also say, respect the stop losses, but I often use options to implement that when I can and don’t worry about downside as much. Finally, the day after you get the newsletter might also not be the right day to buy, but don’t sit on the pick for months either.

I’ve personally made tons of money with CVO, net of losses, and it’s paid itself many times over. You need to have a good understanding of capital gains and losses, and your country’s tax implications, otherwise the losers might drown your gains. It’s probably inappropriate for a retirement account because losses are just losses and you can’t use them to offset taxes on gains.

If you have a small trading account (say, less than $30,000), I think it would be a bad idea to spend $5,000 hoping to make a lot of money. Just don’t do it. This product is not for you. Imagine spending $5000 and then losing $10,000 on a few bad picks in the first few months. You’re already lost 50% of your savings and the hill you have to climb to get back to even is too steep.

This newsletter is really for larger accounts, where you would allocate only a percentage of your portfolio to CVO, for example, 20%. If you have a $50,000 account, that’s $10,000 and IMHO that’s too little to invest meaningfully unless you use option, which not all picks have. I would say life changing gains are possible with CVO, but you sort of have to be rich in the first place to be able to take advantage of it, so they may not be so much life-changing. These gains are just the warm, fuzzy feeling of getting even richer gouging on the glorious blood of naked capitalism, selling worthless pieces of paper to the greater fool and potential future bagholder.

You should probably allocate at least $80,000 to CVO, and that should be money you can afford to lose without affecting your lifestyle. Now you understand why it’s $5,000 to sign up: It’s to weed out the lower net worth individuals, and also Frank probably needs to patch a huge hole in his resource stock portfolio. Plus, football tickets and a bigger bbq.

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