What’s Fitz-Gerald’s “Big Tobacco Must Pay” Teaser all about?

Can you really "claim a portion of the historic $206 billion tobacco settlement?"

Originally published on May 30, 2017

Keith Fitz-Gerald is out with a new ad for his Money Map Report that promises you can “claim” payments from big tobacco — and, naturally, Gumshoe readers are curious… is there really some way that normal folks like you and I can “collect thousands of dollars a month, tax-free, from Master Settlement Payments?”

Well, sort of. But probably not the way you’re thinking. Let’s look at the details and get you some answers…

As with most ads of this sort, the pitch is that this money is sitting there just waiting to be claimed… all you have to do is get your name on the list!

The money comes from the Master Settlement Agreement that the big tobacco companies signed with all the state Attorneys General about 20 years ago, settling all the lawsuits states had filed to both restrict tobacco advertising and to recoup tobacco-related health care costs.

Here’s a little taste of the ad:

“This Master Settlement Agreement has no end date. Big Tobacco is legally obligated to pay out this cash forever.

“In fact, we estimate they’ve been paying out about $686 million a month…

“And it may surprise you to learn that you could personally claim a tax-free portion of this settlement!

“Every month a check made out for $2,300 could arrive in your mailbox…

“Even if you’ve never smoked…”

There’s a lot of stuff in the ad to fire up anger about the big tobacco companies and their practices, from ridiculous advertising about the health benefits of smoking to suppressed research and aggressive lobbying… all of which sets up a straw man that makes you angry, and makes it easier to believe that there’s some way that makes sense for you to deserve and receive some kind of “free money.” More from the ad:

“Big Tobacco destroyed countless lives.

“Their actions placed an undue burden on our healthcare system…

“And they got away with it for too long….

“The Master Settlement Agreement dictates Big Tobacco distribute cash to 46 states and five U.S. territories forever.

“And thanks to a special clause in this deal, Americans have the chance to claim 100% tax-free income from it….

“This money is even guaranteed and backed by the government.”

And more language about how this is something you “claim” and “receive” … nothing about you ever having to do anything other than make a phone call or fill out a form online in order to “begin receiving” the payments.

“At this very moment, government offices in cities and towns across the country are receiving this cash.

“It’s being held in escrow accounts, waiting to be claimed.

“But what most people don’t realize is that even if you weren’t a direct victim of Big Tobacco’s misdeeds…. you can still get a portion of this settlement cash…

And I want to help you do just that.”

And now big are these payments? Fitz-Gerald cites several different examples of indiiduals who have been collecting big from tobacco at $3,300, $5,000 or $6,000 a month, but the number most frequently repeated in the ad is “an average of $2,300 or more.”

So what the heck is he talking about? Is there some “settlement fund” that’s going to give you money?

No.

But there is a settlement fund in most states, and most states have borrowed against that future revenue, so there are a lot of municipal tobacco settlement bonds — and you could buy those bonds to lend money to the state, and receive tax-free municipal bond interest in return that is backed by the perpetual cash flow from the tobacco settlement.

So, tragically, this is an investment — not a magical pool of money that you can just ask for by using a secret codeword because you had a hard time quitting smoking, or lost a family member to lung cancer, or are just angry at tobacco companies in general.

To be fair, Keith Fitz-Gerald does very briefly note that you would have to make a one-time investment — though, as one might expect, he minimizes it and hides it in a section where he’s already got you thinking about lottery-like winnings:

“You’ve heard of a similar deal with lottery winners.

“The person who hits the Powerball will sometimes take a lump-sum payment from the government now instead of receiving annual installments.

“Only this time, it’s the government looking for the lump-sum capital.

“And because your money is being pooled with that of other Americans, you don’t have to put up a great deal to get started.

“Your one-time investment can be as little as $250.

“And in return, you will be transferred a share of the settlement money Big Tobacco is legally obligated to pay that city or small town forever.

“The checks will arrive every month. This income is tax-free.”

There are some unique characteristics to these tobacco-fueled municipal bonds… they are typically tied specifically to the tobacco company payments, so they may in some ways be protected from bankruptcies (ie, if Illinois declares bankruptcy, it might be that the Illinois tobacco bonds continue to receive their payments even if general obligation bonds do not — I can’t promise that this is true, and I’m no tax law expert).

And the tobacco settlement payments themselves are inflation-protected in at least some cases, though each bond is structured differently so I don’t know if they include rising payments (for what it’s worth, lots of people find the sector challenging — the complexity and lack of predictability of the tobacco revenue stream even drove Fitch to stop rating some of these bonds).

That specific connection to one defined string of revenue is somewhat similar to special project bonds, like those that might support the renovation of an airport or of a sewer system and that are paid back by revenue generated by that project (sewer fees, airport fees, etc.). Which can be good or bad, but it does at least make the particular bond more analyze-able because you’re not simply betting on whether or not the state will go bankrupt during the 30 years before the bond matures. And in many cases, the yields will also be higher on those “special projects” because they’re not backed by general taxing authority but by a specific business or activity.

Fitz-Gerald says that this tobacco settlement has generated “156 lucrative deals” …

“The government has worked out a series of very special deals on behalf of ALL AMERICANS.

“Currently, there are 156 lucrative deals to choose from.

“But we don’t anticipate that remaining the case for very long.

“Because Americans who have become privy to what I call ‘Master Settlement Payments’ are beating down doors to lock up their spots.”

I don’t know if the 156 number is accurate or not, there are a bewildering array of municipal tobacco bonds, but the “on behalf of ALL AMERICANS” bit does not mean that everyone gets some of the cash… it means that the state (or city, in a few cases) gets the cash from these ongoing tobacco settlement payments, and they use it how they want to.

So how do these tobacco bonds actually work?

Well, the states settled with the tobacco companies in 1998, dropping their suits and claims for health-related tobacco costs in exchange for an ongoing stream of cash that is based on the number of cigarettes sold.

In most cases, the states initially determined that this cash would go to help cover the health care costs of tobacco that are borne by the state, and to help fund anti-smoking programs… but, of course, when a state budget hits a tough patch (as they all do, from time to time), the temptation was immediately to use this tobacco money to plug other holes in the budget.

And in order to use more of that future tobacco money today to solve the current problems with their budgets, a lot of states decided to essentially sell off this future revenue stream to investors by issuing municipal bonds. The state gets cash up front, the investors get either a fixed or a revenue-dependent coupon payment for 20 or 30 or 40 years or until some preset revenue target is reached.

There are now a large number of these bonds — according to VanEck, Tobacco Settlement Securitization Bonds (they call them TSSB’s) make up a large chunk of the high-yield municipal bond market — and they are probably the most prominent and liquid chunk of the high-yield muni market right now because of Puerto Rico’s bankruptcy (according to that same VanEck article, Puerto Rico munis were about a third of high-yield muni market with about $70 billion in outstanding principal, while tobacco bonds were about $32 billion of the $210 billion total).

So most municipal bond funds, particularly those that offer higher yields, are going to have at least some exposure to this tobacco bond sub-sector. The VanEck Vectors High-Yield Municipal ETF (HYD), for example, has a yield of about 4.5% and six of its top ten holdings are tobacco securitization bonds.

That kind of yield sounds pretty good for any kind of income investment right now, but it’s particularly a high yield for a muni bond, since the primary attraction of munis is that they are free from federal taxes — so if you’re someone in the highest federal tax bracket, and you can get a tax-free yield of 5%, that’s going to give you the same income as a 7.5% yield on a taxable bond. So you can see that someone’s pricing in some risk there — what is it?

Well, partly there’s the risk that the tobacco settlements may bring in less money than expected. The tobacco companies are doing just fine and their cash flow is still very high, but the settlement payments are generally based on the volume of cigarettes sold, NOT on the revenue. Tobacco companies are doing better because they’re raising prices, not because they’re selling more cigarettes… and as states and the federal government also come at tobacco from the other direction, increasing cigarette taxes, they’re further depressing the sales of cigarettes. Cigarette sales have been in persistent decline for decades, and that was calculated into the initial formulation of these bonds, but the decline has often been substantially faster than was predicted.

And there’s also the risk that tax laws might change, and that interest rates might change — that’s arguably why municipal bonds collapsed late last year at the time of the election (though they’ve made up about half of that fall already)… not only did interest rates bump up quickly as investors started to worry about a new wave of deficit spending and inflation, hurting all kinds of bonds, but risks of a meaningful change to tax law suddenly appeared. The two big tax law things that could impact municipal bonds are the tax benefit, meaning that the Feds could either take away or limit the tax-free nature of municipal bond income, and the tax rate itself, since if tax rates are cut then being tax-free is less of a benefit.

So there’s clearly risk, though I think fears of major tax law changes to muni bonds are probably overstated — even if you premise that Congress and the President will agree on something in the near future, which itself is quite a leap right now, they’re unlikely to take away a tax break primarily used by financially comfortable retirees… if only because those folks are probably the most reliable voters in the country (the general finding of most surveys is that, as the NY Times noted in an article last Fall, “The richer, older and more educated you are, the more likely you are to vote.”)

Are there hidden opportunities in this little world? Probably so… I’m not at all an expert at analyzing municipal bonds, and analyzing and buying individual municipal bonds, particularly those that are complex and non-standard like tobacco bonds, is certainly outside my wheelhouse.

There are some great articles looking at this segment if you’d like to start to build your own understanding of how it all works — I’d start with ProPublica’s piece about the big-picture problems with state tobacco bond financing to provide some perspective, though things have changed a little since then (that was in 2014), then move on to an article from PIMCO’s David Hammer about “seeking value in the ashes” in this sector, from about two years ago, and a Nuveen article about “careful credit analysis” in tobacco bonds. That should give at least some basic level of understanding of how the bonds work and what’s been impacting their prices.

An individual investor looking to build a municipal bond portfolio would probably want to work with a broker who has some expertise in this sector — trading and analyzing individual bonds is not for everyone, and you will probably want to hold at least a dozen bonds in order to get some diversification, which would mean committing at least $50-100,000 to a municipal bond portfolio (most bonds transact in groups of at least five or ten, which would be $5,000-$10,000 of principal for each issuer). And unless you’re able to analyze and trade those bonds at pretty low cost, brokerage fees, either in management fees from the firm who helps you or in the commissions built into the spread offered to you on those bonds, might be prohibitively expensive with a portfolio of that size.

Discount brokers like Fidelity or Vanguard will trade individual muni bonds (or corporate bonds) for you, at generally quite low cost, but they probably won’t hold your hand and tell you which tobacco funds are riskier than others or explain any other esoteric aspects of specific offerings.

I’d personally be much more interested in a diversified portfolio through a mutual fund, ETF or closed-end fund if I were considering municipal bonds — and if you’re looking for a higher-yielding muni bond offering from any of those kinds of mutual funds, it’s almost certainly going to include a healthy slug of tobacco bonds.

I skimmed through the portfolios of a half-dozen municipal bond ETFs and closed-end funds with yields of over 4%, and didn’t find any that didn’t have at least 5-10% of their portfolio allocated to tobacco bonds, but Morningstar says there are some municipal bond managers who eschew the sector. That VanEck index fund I noted above, the VanEck Vectors High-Yield Municipal Index ETF (HYD), has 18.5% of its portfolio in tobacco bonds right now, so to some degree that offers a meaningful amount of diversification for those looking for high yield municipal bonds and a possible kicker if tobacco bonds turn out to be the best part of that market (that’s not a recommendation, I haven’t looked at all the high-yield muni ETFs and don’t know how their strategies or portfolios differ, but I think HYD is the largest and lowest cost ETF in that segment).

What would it take to get that $2,300 a month that Fitz-Gerald promotes, then, from this “master settlement?” Well, there are a wide variety of tobacco bonds that are currently priced very differently, but in skimming through some lists it looks like 5% is a decent guess for the average yield for these bonds, many of which have maturities out 20-30 years. $2,300 a month would be (math alert!) $27,600 a year. If you’re earning a 5% yield on your investment, and it totals $27,600 a year, then that means your initial investment is $540,000.

So one thing is certain, if you start with a one-time investment of “as little as $250,” as the ad notes, you’re not getting anything near that $2,300 a month in income. A $250 portfolio of tobacco bonds would provide you with income of about $1 a month (that’s just to illustrate, of course, you can’t typically buy individual bonds in sub-$1,000 increments — though you could buy a few shares of a broader high-yield municipal bond ETF for that price and get roughly that kind of income).

And, of course, though municipal bonds are historically much less risky than corporate bonds, with very low default risk, you are taking some risk in lending money to these tobacco settlement funds, or to states and municipalities in general, and that risk is substantially higher if you buy a few individual muni bonds than if you buy a portfolio of muni bonds in a mutual fund or ETF of some sort. Even if the tobacco cash flow stays steady enough to provide you with the expected return on your bond or your portfolio of bonds, you could easily lose money if interest rates rise dramatically and you have to sell bonds before they mature… and if tax law changes, the income could suddenly become less attractive to you if you have to pay taxes on it.

So, yes, you can (sort of) “stake your claim” to the “Master Settlement Agreement,” and you probably can generate income of $2,300 a month from that “claim”… but it’s not really a claim, it’s an investment return — the first step, before pocketing that $2,300 a month, is taking a half million dollars of your money and investing it in municipal bonds backed by tobacco settlement cash flows (and taking some level of risk in the process). Somehow, Fitz-Gerald’s ad didn’t really focus on that part where you put up the money… funny, that.

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126 Comments on "What’s Fitz-Gerald’s “Big Tobacco Must Pay” Teaser all about?"

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walter housley jr
Guest
0

would someone please tell me this not a scam on the big tobacco must pay settlement,i deserve it,all the taxes I pay

Jay
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Jay

If you read the last paragraph of this article, it explains you have invest an obscene amount of money to take part of this. Basically, you are bailing out the State by buying a bond. If you have a retirement 401k, this might be good for you. It doesn’t look as promising as he suggests in the video though. If you have no money, sorry there is no free money here.

Ernst Hall
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Ernst Hall

It is a municipal bond offer. Nominally or supposedly backed by the Big Tobacco payout, it sounds guaranteed. But it would not be the first time a state or municipality changed its mind and kept its money. This is a scam.

Erika
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Erika

Thank you so much Ernst Hall

john samick
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0

its ascam to abuse those who have lost family to cancer and cancer patitents such as myself

cc
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cc

Sorry this is a give him your money and he will happily spend your money.

VeeeDubb
Guest
0

Tobacco bonds?? WTF!!! I knew Keith was blowing smoke up our asses for his profit line. Slathering that layer of dookie real thick. THANKS StockGumshow for showing the real hidden truth Keith PURPOSELY NEGLECTED to divulge in his lengthy smoke blowing teaser.

wertywyey
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wertywyey

https://moneymorning.com/acq/ is garbage, nothing but infomercials. anyone who sits thru the hour long videos deserves to be disappointed.

TruthSeeker
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TruthSeeker

I should hunt down, and SUE the JERK who sent me that scam email. I am too damned poor to be scammed! Go after rich people, who got that way by scamming people like myself. Go to HELL!

TruthSeeker
Guest
0
TruthSeeker
Oh, is that their name? The Fitz-Geralds are the ones scamming people? Where are they located? Where do they live? They must be the scum who sent me that email scam. They need to be prosecuted for FRAUD. I never gave them permission to send me any emails, much less for their vile purposes of making illegal money, and scamming the IRS. Perhaps I should report them to the IRS. They need to be audited immediately, by the IRS. Perhaps they belong to that CULT called ‘Scientology’. So many scammers out there. They will go straight to HELL, but not… Read more »
Normally Dubious
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0
Normally Dubious

I’m about at the point where I click the Unsubscribe link in response to EVERY mailing from MMP….except I am subscribed to Bill Patalon’s private briefing, and that unfortunately means that I get mail from him pushing programs from Dr. Kent Moors and Keith Fitz – Gerald etc.

liberallez
Irregular
29
liberallez

“Easy, big fella!” You live in a wild world where the predators co-mingle with the prey.
You don’t see the sheep ranting about suing the wolves…
Instead, they stay alert, learn the ways of the wolves and develop techniques (such as supporting Travis) to avoid being eaten.
And…they don’t call upon the bigger predators (IRS) to protect them from the little ones.

Fishook
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Fishook

very good analysis

m muscato
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m muscato

thank you for the lowdown. if it sounds too good to be true,it usually is “NOT TRUE”. I can’t believe i listened to 25 min of that BS, before I started researching it. Thanks for the honest info on this money just waiting to be had. I knew it the minute he said in my free report. aaaaahhhhhhg

liberallez
Irregular
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liberallez

They don’t want you to escape so, most times if you click the “x” to close the page, you’ll see a leave/stay on page choice box. If you click “stay on page” it’ll give you a transcript you can scan and scroll in order to quickly get a feel for the BS.

Hilary P
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Hilary P

Thanks for the dose of reality…and breaking it all down!! (Helping me avoid a breakdown…and doing something really sick…like spending even a penny of my money in a direction in any way able to be construed as pro-tobacco!!!)

snoopycat
Member
31

Another political scam. Big Tobacco money was supposed to help victims fight lung cancer and other medical conditions caused by tobacco use. Like other funding received by our government, politicians quickly divert it to their own special interests for political gain. A logical use would be to fund a health care bill that congress s dragging its feet on passing. Since congress has their own 100% free healthcare system, they don’y really care. They should be forced to use the heath-care system that they pass.

brian
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brian

all in all? is it guaranteed you will receive monthly checks on behalf of big tobacco?
with a small investment of $250? he explains, and how long in general would it take to receive this money? or is this a scam?

None
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None

Yeah, guaranteed! But you should send your investment to me. I am the one who guarantees. You send me 250 per month, and I will send you 2500 back.

dave
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dave

Join the discussion no, send it to me. im the guy!!! send me $250.00 and ill guarantee you $25,000.00!!!! I wont give it to you but ill guarantee it!

liberallez
Irregular
29
liberallez

Read what Travis wrote…all the answers are in there.

An Americanca Concerned Citizen
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An Americanca Concerned Citizen

Like Dad always said……If it looks like a HOT Steaming Pile of Horse Sh*t and If it Smells Like Horse Sh*t then guess what it is !!!!!!! It certainly does not take a Philadelphia Lawyer to see that this 35 minutes of Horse Crap is nothing short of a Illegal SCAM ……. In fact I am forwarding this video to our State Attorney Generals Office in the Morning…. for Interstate FRAUD investigation !

What a LOAD of Horse Sh*t !

anthony barbuto
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anthony barbuto

lousy swine that Fitzgerald…I had to listen to his pitch for 20 minutes…he mentioned $250 in his pitch as a partial investment….travis did the math and the reality was a $500,000 investment needed to get $2300 per month….I think I am just going to block fitzgerald from my in box…..hope the coming crash wipes him out..

backoffice
Irregular
166

he mentions something about filing on line to the states. What do people do that don’t have 500,000 to park somewhere to get 2,300 a month?

bobechs
Guest
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bobechs

Answer: Social Security pension benefit, if that’s what your contributions entitle you to and you are of age to file, online or otherwise.

tanglesome
Member
9
tanglesome

If anyone is interested in following up on Travis’ kinda-sorta-maybe plug for VanEck Vectors High-Yield Municipal ETF (HYD), check them out on Morningstar.

I just did and not only is their exposure to tobacco bonds at 15.2% of the fund – much higher than the average for its class as Travis said – its exposure to Illinois and Chicago muni bonds is at 12.5% of the fund….yeah no thanks.

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/could-illinois-be-the-first-state-to-file-for-bankruptcy/

George Evers
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0

Money Map Press spews fake news at it’s finest, twisting facts so you can gain an opinion. Collecting opinions and making opinionated choices within those kinds of boxes only leads to frustration. Thanks for blowing up the box!

fred quimby quimby
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fred quimby quimby

I wrote to 4 stated and told them to start sending me my part of the cash settlement

no answer

da_j_man
Member
0
da_j_man

Still no answer from those 4 states

Raphael Avila
Guest
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Raphael Avila

Fitzgerald should be silenced – permanently. A liar and scammer, a sub-human without honor.

Mike
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Mike

The old adage, “If it sounds to good to be true, it probably, (and as in this case), is not”, certainly applies here! Thanks for the straight skinny.

Mike
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Mike

Does ANYBODY really think an investment of $250 would produce an immediate return of $2300 a month? The only loss here is the twenty minutes I spent listening to that possibility! JEEES!

Ollie
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Ollie

If it sounds too good to be true, it usually is not true. It appears to me the only one to make money is FitzGerald. $149 from those under 65 and $79 from those over 65.

Cari
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Cari

Thank you!!!! I thought it sounded like a scam. If this Fitz-Gerald is so successful then why dose he need to stoop so low as to have this misleading advertisement. I see it as yet another attack on lower income people.

WNS
Guest
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WNS

IMPORTANT!!! MOST OF THESE BONDS ARE NOT TAX EXEMPT.. MMP HAS BEEN ADVISED AND HAS DONE NOTHING TO CORRECT THEIR MISTAKE. DID NOT READ YOUR WHOLE ARTICLE SO YOU MIGHT HAVE MENTIONED THIS. THEY ARE LIARS

Joseph Andraski
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Joseph Andraski

I read Keith Fitz-Gerald, who promised time and again that the government would monthly compensation for merely registering. where and how to register was information that would be provided.
Bottom line, it will take a $500k investment in a bond to earn $2,300!
Mr. Fitz-Gerald has attempted to hoodwink all of us who sat through his presentation. I had a less than ideal experience with the Money Map organization, followed by this debacle,

D. S. Hess
Guest
0
D. S. Hess

If something sounds to easy or to good to be true, it Is Always a SCAM.

Thanks for the Honesty, Keith
I’m guessing you worked closely with CNN.

How do these ppl get away with Presentations that are so dishonest.

My Rule on Internet presentations is if it’s more than 10 minutes Long, SCAM Alert

Paddy
Guest
0

These Internet presentations don’t have to be viewed as video. Just click OFF, then click STAY and read the text without having to wait for the screens to change.

Paddy
Guest
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Paddy

Don’t need to watch presentations as video. Just click off then click STAY and read text without having to wait for screens to display.

liberallez
Irregular
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liberallez

Travis, you are a pearl in a world of slimy oysters!!!
I figured this was a sleight of thought scam and came to you for confirmation.
I am so tired of MMP, I’m going to block everything I can, coming from them.
Although, they’re so slimy they’ll probably ooze through the cracks.
BTW…I’ve decided to upgrade from free member to paid, because you deserve to be paid richly for the work you do.
Thanks again!!

backoffice
Guest
0
backoffice

nothing for the smoker, all for the government who allowed the lies to be told while reaping the benefits, and still allowing it and taxing the hell out of it. Seems the government didn’t lose any money

Ed Shuman
Guest
0
Ed Shuman

What a deceptive Scumbag! Pay $500,000 to get $2300 a month! Wow what a deal!And the spots are going quick! Don;t be left out!Sure looks like he wants people to pay $150? or so to find out what a special ripp=off this is.

john samick
Guest
0

he is athieft a con artest who needs to go to prison

sky grayeagle
Guest
0
sky grayeagle
ok i hear its a scam its NOT i got this email about this i checked it out i tryed but road blocks i called rj reynolds got lucky talk to a lady well i am a retired radio dj this lady said you sound just like a guy i listened to on radio i ask who was that well it was me well she gave me some info and guess what its not alot but i am getting 1200 a month now it took 6 months before i got it and had to make quite a few calls and… Read more »
Tom
Guest
0
Tom

Can you send how you did this in detail to me with numbers to call .

cyberspecies2014
Irregular
0
cyberspecies2014

Can you post details? Thanks

Skeeter
Guest
0
Skeeter
Thank you for this logical and lucid explanation of Fitzgerald’s “Free-Lunch,” video. I received this latest quick $-scheme in an Email and watched the entire video. Just another,”Too good to be true,” moment was my first thought and the “one small investment” line set off alarms; thereby, skepticism reared its head-coupled with Fitzgerald’s alleged, altruistism-all the booklets are FREE. Yep, after you make an initial investment to His Money Map Report for a mere $79. (sic) Luckily I found your website and reality replaced a minor lapse of wishful thinking! Once again, thanks to you, “There is no such thing… Read more »
Wanda Mytwat
Guest
0
Wanda Mytwat

I’d likely get a better return trading tobacco stocks, than I would following this dweebs advice. I’m all for the First Amendment, but really…he makes it sound like a DIY kit and I’ve never heard of a way to buy bonds without paying a broker. It’s a fine line between the 2 “F” words…

John Lobotsky
Guest
0
John Lobotsky

anyone try Chris Johnsons seismic trading.

piprider
Irregular
2
piprider

STAY AWAY, Don’t even think about it.. the system does not work, and as always very difficult to get the refund or guarantee. i know i stupidly subscribed and i am a professional trader.

erug
Member
2
erug

Read the teaser in my in box, One subject line selling the litigation and settlement was pointed at False Advertisements of the tobacco companies. Well as pointed out in the critiquing of this Master piece of deceptive newsletter sign up drive, I find the same type of soft lying, based in some fantastic level of achieving easy money. Any body who has ever worked or sweated any investment knows there is no free lunch. Maybe deceptive marketing like this teaser should be hauled in front of the FCC, fraud by wire.

J. Dana Deal
Guest
0
J. Dana Deal
Move on Fitz-Gerald . Are we Americans not struggling enough. I was 45 in the BEST shape of my life when one day while working I out of no where had a massive stroke. My identical twin sister and I are looking at ways to help me earn income as the doctor’s, hospital, pharmacy, physically Therapy and everything else that is involved with something that hits you out of nowhere. We are now 51 and for this article to even state things like ” student loans” vacations, etc . This is a moral sin . Buddy you live large at… Read more »
Ellie
Guest
0
Ellie

I guees the 4 states that are not participating are the smart ones?

Foo Ling Yu
Guest
0
Foo Ling Yu

What does it say for the U.S. Judicial system when scam artists like this are allowed to continue their fleecing of the gullible without even so much as a slap on the wrist? Of course, if it can’t put blatant criminal politicians behind bars with enough proof and evidence to sink a ship, how can we expect them to go after the smaller fish either. This country has gone to hell in a hand basket.

Stacy Jo McDermott
Guest
0
Stacy Jo McDermott

Just got a teaser today about this…and who did I turn to? Mr.Stock gum shoe! Thank you for setting the record straight!

Dane
Guest
0
Dane

you all were about to get ripped off, he offered it to me for 79.00 lol

Rich
Guest
0
Rich

Anyone ever hear of “common sense” and the little “x” in the upper right hand side of the screen?

Al Razzi
Guest
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Al Razzi

keith is funny in playing such tricks. Previously ,he had an article on some 611 payment ,you can have a decent $50,00 income from these Government approved funds. Actually it turns out to be some common Mutual Funds from Fidelity. These can be purchased by any one who has money to invest. It gave the impression that this is some Government plan for you to stake your share in this.

John A
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John A

Thanks to Stock Gumshoe for revealing the truth about another of these “too good to be true” investments. Fitz-Gerald is using the same old con so prevalent in this market, citing large amounts of monthly income for which you have to invest a huge sum of money in to realize, at a not so unusual interest rate. As for tobacco bonds, it looks like they’re just another form of state or municipal bond and have plenty of risk.

John S
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John S
Travis, thanks for confirming what I was gathering from watching the video. Fitz-Gerald does drop a couple of little ‘hints’ that this is a bond investment opportunity when he keeps talking about ‘deals’, when he mentions ‘the government wanting the money all at once’, and the lack of residency requirements. What I found really telling was the math – how can I get >~$2300/month from a ‘small investment’ of ~$250.00?? (It didn’t help his pitch that all of his ‘success stories’ and ‘testimonial’ pictures seemed to be from older couples that appeared to at least be financially stable.) The takeaway… Read more »
leelee decker
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leelee decker

i was awarded over 120 thousand from a tobacco suit i filed because i started smoking at 9 years old until i was 37 i now have copd ,heart disease and other complications due from smoking as i said i was awarded 129 thousand BUT only received 20 thousand the attorneys took all the rest!i am the one dying and they get to party off it freakin shame!

Jim Wetzel
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Jim Wetzel

KF-G is squeezing every dollar he can get from the Tobacco Industry Master Settlement Payments before buying YOU out for a lump sum….he needs to GFHimself.

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