What’s the $100 million “Soldier Super Sight” Company?

What's being teased by Rickards & Massengill’s Defense Technology Alert?

The latest ad from Agora Financial’s Defense Technology Alert created a deluge of “what are those super contact lenses?” questions here at Stock Gumshoe, so as we dig out of the weekend teaser pile this one clearly rises to the “gotta answer it first” spot. What’s the story?

Well, the ad is for Defense Technology Alert, which is a high-price ($2,000/yr) “back end” newsletter co-edited by Kevin Massengill and Jim Rickards, and it’s all about profiting from high-tech military advancements — it’s pretty tough to sustain super-niche newsletters like this for very long, but it looks like this letter has taken the place of Byron King’s Military-Tech Alert that Agora published for a while.

They’re pushing the connection to President Trump’s professed desire for more military spending as a reason to invest in these smaller military technology stocks (they’re not the only ones, the Casey folks have a new “military tech” teaser pitch out as well that I’m hoping to look into soon)… and the specific bait that they dangle in front of us is a “smart contact” technology that is apparently owned by some tiny $100 million company. Here’s the headline:

“SOLDIER SUPER-SIGHT

“It Will Solve One of the Military’s Biggest Problems…

“Overturn Ten Industries Worth a Combined $2.46 Trillion…

“And Could Create Massive Fortunes for Investors Who Buy Into a Tiny $100 Million Company…”

And, of course, the talented copywriters at Agora make our palms prickle with anticipated wealth as they go on…

“It gives our men and women in uniform the ability to identify and see threats… know where to shoot… where NOT to shoot… where to step…

“With robotic-like precision.

“And this isn’t some distant, far-off fantasy land…

“This soldier super- technology is about to be deployed very, very soon.

“And already, the money is flowing…

“The U.S. military and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency both partially funded this technology’s creation…

“The National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health have also funded it…

“And now, finally, one small public company… trading for just 2 cents per share… has brought this revolutionary technology to the one-yard line and near completion.”

OK… so this is going to be a problem. Yes, Agora Financial is charging a lot for this subscription at $2,000… but still, if this is like past Agora ad campaigns, they’re going to send this teaser pitch to a couple million people. Some of them have their own Thinkolators at hand (not as good as ours, of course, but not every car has to be a Rolls Royce), or will subscribe, and have you ever seen what happens to a sleepy little penny stock when a couple thousand new investors get lusty about it?

Yes, that’s right, it almost doesn’t matter what we say about this one — the stock is going to go bonkers from all the new attention. We’ve seen it happen time and time again whenever a tiny stock is recommended by a big publishing house with access to huge email lists… and you should be prepared to think for a moment before considering any investment in these kinds of stocks: Am I buying it because I think this newsletter editor really has critical information that other investors don’t have, I’ve backed up that research with my own understanding of the company, and therefore the stock is really 10X more valuable than the market previously thought… or am I buying it just because I’m excited about seeing a penny stock jump dramatically?

If the latter, if you’re just caught up in the promises of Jim Rickards and Kevin Massengill, remember that stock surges that are caused by an artificial increase in the number of interested buyers tend to go away pretty quickly once the stream of new buyers rolling across the transom slows down, and getting back to a “real” equilibrium price for the stock can sometimes be painful if you get overly excited and buy it while it’s surging.

I say all that up front just because the $100 million market cap and the two cent share price make me nervous… I haven’t even fired up the Thinkolator yet to ID the company, so let’s do that and see if we have any more clues to feed into the hopper.

“If you looked at the tallest buildings in New York City…

“A big defense contractor like Lockheed Martin would be One World Trade Center.

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“Raytheon would be the Empire State Building…

“And this tiny firm would the tiny hot dog cart on the city street corner.

“That’s how tiny this firm is.

“But I believe soon this company could announce news that will send its share price soaring fourfold… all the way up to 100-fold if the stars align.”

The imaging that they use in the ad is very much like that of a “first person shooter” video game — these “smart contacts” supposedly make it possible to identify enemy soldiers through smoke and haze, to spot IEDs or other hazards, plot coordinates and map out paths to travel, identify the location of your fellow soldiers, etc.

Here’s more from the ad:

“A basic form of this technology is being used already in the helmets of F-35 pilots.

“Of course, the pilots already wore helmets that covered 100% of their face, so it was easiest to implement this technology into their existing equipment.

“But for troops on the ground in action, the military needs something less intrusive…<