What’s the “White Oil” Pitch from Lou Basenese About?

What "LCE" and "White Oil" Stocks are teased by Venture Cap Strategist?

By Travis Johnson, Stock Gumshoe, October 19, 2016

Louis Basenese has a new ad promoting his VentureCap Strategist newsletter ($2,000 a year), and it gets our attention with lots of hot air about “White Oil” … which, he says, is explosive in both chemical terms and investment potential.

Here’s a taste of the intro:

“This new White Oil is spiking 9X faster than the price of gold…

“The investment analysts at Goldman Sachs call it ‘the new gasoline.’ And MIT-trained chemical scientists call it ‘the holy grail.’ Because it’s 2116 times more powerful than the black oil you’re pumping into your engine now….

“… our models show potential for a 33,700% sector growth explosion….

“Drive 3 hours north from Las Vegas — like our venture cap strategy team just did — and you can hold a jar of this White Oil in your own hands.

“Feeling greedy? You can claim your stake in an entire MOUNTAIN of it today with just one click of your mouse.”

Basenese even includes a video of a “drunk hillbilly” setting a jar of salt water on fire… and implies that this new fuel will be a savior without “alternative energy” tax breaks:

“… what the salt water in that jar contains is valued at trillions upon trillions of dollars….

“… it’s the final American kill-shot that will put Vladimir Putin and the Saudi royal family out of business.

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“For good.

“With no need for ‘alternative energy’ gizmos that run on sunbeams, good wishes, or pork-barrel tax breaks either.

“Because this White Oil burns more than three times as clean as the oil and natural gas we use now.

“And just a little of it goes a long, long way.”

He even goes so far as to say that his camerman drove the six hour round trip to Clayton County, Nevada from Las Vegas in a Chevy coupe that was “running 100% on White Oil” and used “just two tablespoons.”

So what the heck is he talking about? Some kind of saltwater fuel that you pump out of the ground and burn in your car? That’s what it sounds like, right? Especially when he has prominent notes like this in his ad:

“It’s a liquid fuel. You pump it out of the ground. You refine it. You put it in your car. You drive. Then you fuel up again… 8 years later.”

But, of course, it’s not a fuel at all (even though yes, the source brine can be flammable or even explosive). What Basenese is talking about (though he doesn’t once mention the word in his ad) is lithium. Lithium prices are often quoted as “lithium carbonate equivalent (LCE)”, and he does slip up and use that “LCE” term a few times…

… and, of course, anyone who’s been paying attention to the lithium market lately will know that Clayton County, Nevada is the only current lithium production site in the US (that’s Albemarle’s , and that it has also hosted a land grab in the last couple years as companies have staked out potential future production because of the hotly anticipated multi-year lithium demand spike coming on the heels of Tesla’s Gigafactory opening and other lithium battery production increases for the electric car market.

If you’ve not been paying attention to the whole electric vehicle trend, lithium is the lightest metal on the periodic table and is one of the key ingredients in lithium-ion batteries. That basic battery technology has been around for decades, and is what powers most portable electronics (laptops, phones, etc.), but the big new(ish) anticipated demand increase is from electric vehicles… thanks largely to the fact that Tesla, since the first roadster was built, has based their battery designs on huge networks of what are, for lack of a better term, standard laptop batteries.

So we’ve seen lithium stocks pitched off and on over the past five years, and those pitches have heated up in recent years as Tesla’s Gigafactory is being built and going online in Nevada — that’s mostly because the Gigafactory is, above all, designed to dramatically cut the price of batteries… and the only way it can do that is if it is extremely efficient and produces a huge number of batteries to achieve economies of scale, which is why it’s so incredibly massive (when finished, it is expected to have the largest footprint of any building in the world).

That size and dramatic ramp-up in production of batteries, which will be needed if Tesla is to achieve real commercial scale, producing hundreds of thousands of cars a year at more modest price points than their current luxury models, is also going to require a huge amount of lithium carbonate. It will also require a lot of graphite, which accounts for more of the weight of the battery than the lithium does, but graphite is by no means in short supply… and lithium might be.

That’s not because lithium is rare. It’s not particularly hard to find, and vast reserves are known — particularly in the real heart of global lithium production, in the high desert peaks of the Andes of South America, but also in Australia and China. and, to a smaller degree in Nevada and a few other places… but production is not high enough to satisfy anticipated future demand from a booming electric car market, so there are lots of projects on the drawing board to both build new capacity and expand existing production. That makes resource investors and speculators smell money, and lithium prices have already risen pretty dramatically over the past couple of years as customers sense that future supply pressure… so, naturally, the newsletter guys are beating the bushes to find exciting lithium stories to tell and lithium stocks to recommend.

SilverPeakThis is what lithium production looks like from the sky — most lithium is not mined (though some is, particularly in Australia, where there is substantial mined production from spodumene — but that’s generally a more expensive production method), the best concentrations of lithium are in underground salt brine “lakes” and most lithium is produced by pumping that saltwater out of the ground, evaporating the water in huge pools (one reason why production is all in sunny, arid locations), and processing the lithum carbonate out of the resulting “ore.”

These underground salt lakes (salars) and evaporation pools also generally have high concentrations of other minerals, often including magnesium and iodine and potassium… usually, in fact, more potassium than lithium, so agricultural demand for fertilizers also has a substantial impact on the economics of most lithium producers (economic plans for lithium projects often use an assumption about potassium prices as a net credit to offset the production cost for lithium, much the same way a gold mine in its investor materials might use the “credit” of the silver they also produce to offset the per-ounce cash cost of the gold production). SQM in Chile has for many years been the global giant of lithium, but they’re also a major fertilizer company… none of the big three lithium producers, SQM, Albemarle and FMC, have historically gotten anything close to a majority of their revenue from lithium (that “big three,” to be clear, is no longer quite as dominant as they were when lithium demand was sleepier a decade ago, thanks to some new producers and a bigger push from Chinese companies into the business, but they still control a huge amount of global lithium production).

If you want to see some other images or get an idea of the massive scale of the lithium production projects or of the Gigafactory itself, check out this post on a Google Earth blog for some pictures.

We’ve already written about a bunch of these over the past couple years… so, what specifically is it that Basenese is talking about within the lithium space?

We don’t get a lot of detailed clues, but we get some hints that will help us give you at least an idea of the stocks he has in mind…

“This is the only ‘pure play’ on White Oil that covers all the best mining sites in Nevada.

“That’s why I’ve identified the top five White Oil stocks for you….

“… my own personal map of White Oil country. The one I began sketching out after that jar of this fuel exploded right in front of my eyes.

“But this is more than just a map. It’s also a five-stock venture cap strategy alert that shows you how to ‘R.I.N.G.’ the entire Clayton County White Oil reserve. Including the mine that’s already operating in Silver Peak. And the other four around it that have the highest growth potential… in other words, stocks that could go up many times higher than White Oil in general.”

So that leads me to think that he’s focused on Clayton County, as many folks are — partly because it’s a lot closer to the Tesla Gigafactory than the other sources of lithium supply around the world, though I expect that will not be that big a deal… it’s not like they’re going to get all their cobalt or nickel or graphite from Nevada, almost all the raw materials are going to be shipped in from far and wide like they are for most factories. And production is already being boosted to meet the demand of the Gigafactory — according to the FT, FMC has already agreed to boost production almost enough to meet the Gigafactory’s immediate goal of supplying enough batteries for 500,000 cars, and is also already planning to triple their lithium hydroxide refining capacity, and that lithium is likely coming from Argentina and being refined in either China or North Carolina (not sure which location does which products).

But anyway, what would these top five Clayton Valley stocks be? Basenese does not provide any further clues, but we can make some speculations:

First is Albemarle (ALB), the only US producer of lithium and owner of the Silver Peak mine. Albemarle has made some substantial efforts to increase lithium production in Chile and to boost their refining capacity since taking over Rockwood’s lithium projects after the merger a few years ago… but I have seen no indication that they plan to expand Silver Peak or intend to make that a bigger part of their supply. That gives me some pause, since it indicates to me that there’s something more attractive about the South American properties — lower costs, better product, better access to refining or to skilled labor or whatever, I don’t know… but the big companies are expanding like crazy in South America, and Silver Peak is just chugging along as a relatively small global player and a small part of Albemarle’s production.

Second are the companies whose properties surround Albemarle’s Silver Peak. As you’re probably aware, whenever there’s a successful mine you’ll see miners (often tiny guys) staking the property around the mine to see if they can piggyback on that success, with the theory generally being that “if there’s good stuff here, there will be good stuff next door, too.”

That leads us to probably the most hyped two stocks in the US lithium space over the past year, Pure Energy Minerals and Lithium X.

Pure Energy Minerals (PE.V, PEMIF) has a position to the south of Silver Peak, and Lithium X (LIX.V, LIXXF) has acreage both south and north of the operating Silver Peak project, you can get a better idea of the acreage from this map that I borrowed from the Lithium X website:

LithiumXClayton

I’ve written about both of those before — Pure Energy was teased as a play on “Extraterrestrial Gold” by Oil & Gas Trader earlier this year, and my opinion on that one hasn’t really changed. They’re trying both to test the brines (which apparently is going fine so far) and to continue testing their refining technology — they are trying to develop a faster lithium extraction process, using solvents, that can extract the lithium and then return the brine to the earth fairly quickly instead of building giant evaporation pools.

That has captured the attention of a lot of investors, but I’d be pretty skeptical of the potential — there’s plenty of lithium that can be profitably extracted using the low-cost evaporation method, and from what I can tell Pure Energy hasn’t gotten close to an economic analysis of their Clayton Valley project, either, using their new refining process or conventional pools, though perhaps they have estimates of what it might cost that I haven’t seen.

My current thinking today is that I’d be a little skeptical of any early-stage lithium dreamer, given the huge reserves that current producers already have to work with — usually the exit plan for a junior miner is to get bought out because the existing producers are running short on reserves, and I don’t think that’s the case for anyone in lithium world… the juniors will probably actually have to have economically reasonable projects, and they might even have to build them themselves like Orocobre (ORL.TO, OROCF) did in Argentina over the past few years. Pure Energy gets mentioned a lot, and it has a good story to it, and that means it will participate in any bubble that we might see among the lithium stocks… but I wouldn’t put my money into it and sock that holding away for five years, I’d consider these stocks to be pretty wild early-stage speculations that don’t really have any underlying fundamentals to talk about yet — it’s all story and hope.

Lithium X is perhaps a little further along, though that’s debatable… it’s certainly larger, and it has two meaningful projects, the Clayton Valley land and their project in Argentina, which I’d be a bit more optimistic about actually getting built and being meaningful. It’s also very much a hyped-up story, thanks partly to the fact that Canadian resource legend and entrepreneur Frank Giustra was the initial financier… I wrote about that a few weeks ago here (it may not have been the right answer for that tease, which I noted at the time, but it has certainly been covered by other newsletter folks like Nick Hodge), nothing big has happened with this one in recent weeks.

The other names on that map are…

Cypress Development (CYP.V, CYDVF), which is an almost impossibly tiny company — their large plot to the east of Silver Peak is part of a joint venture deal with Pure Energy Minerals, but Cypress is far smaller and really shouldn’t be public. You could look at that stock as well if you like, but the market cap is only $2 million and teensy junior mining stocks in “hot” sectors like this are prone to severe manipulation… so be careful. I don’t know if there’s something “real” behind the company or not.

Nevada Sunrise (NEV.V, NVSGF), which has mostly been a gold explorer but started turning itself into a lithium company about a year ago. They’re tiny, but they have three possible sites in Nevada for lithium and apparently they also own some water rights in Clayton Valley that they think will be important for lithium extraction (I have no idea what the politics of water are in that area when it comes to salt brines, though the evaporation ponds are not generally a beloved part of the landscape and also may also create environmental concerns when it comes to migratory birds, etc…. I don’t know if those are serious concerns or not).

And I’ll throw out a guess that perhaps number five in this Clayton Valley stock report might be Advantage Lithium (AAL.V, AVLIF), which has partnered with Nevada Sunrise on five of their lithium projects, including the Clayton Northeast one near Lithium X’s northern projects.

So that’s what I’ll throw out as guesses for your five Clayton Valley lithium stocks… though I will also be a fuddy duddy and reiterate that I’m not all that excited about US lithium production, I think the South American projects are more compelling, so the only ones I’d think of as having more fundamental potential are Lithium X and Albemarle.

None of the lithium stocks are really cheap right now, but they will all likely have growing lithium production to help meet demand. Scaling up takes some time, but it is happening — the major producers don’t need to buy new properties to expand, they just have to be confident enough in demand to put the money into developing and refining their existing reserves.

Basenese says that this investment might be appealing “if you could be sure of just a few things” (if you’re not sure of anything, he says “buy gold”):

“But what if you could be sure of JUST A FEW THINGS? Because:

“You agree with Warren Buffett that White Oil could fuel America’s future . No matter what else happens.

“That’s why the ‘Oracle of Omaha’ has already made his first investment in what we’ve been calling White Oil — and is up a tidy 300% plus profit for his trouble.

“And why we believe it’s possible that Uncle Warren may want to use White Oil instead of coal and diesel to power all the trains that run across the 32,500 miles of North American railway he owns.”

Buffett has not made any direct investments in lithium as far as anyone knows, though he has invested heavily in alternative energy through his utility companies (mostly wind and solar projects)… so presumably this reference is to the investment Berkshire made many years ago in BYD, the Chinese lithium-ion battery company that turned itself into an electric car (and now electric bus) company. That investment is up roughly that much since Charlie Munger urged Buffett to buy in about eight years ago.

“You agree with America’s #1 CEO that White Oil could ‘transform the entire energy infrastructure of the world.’ No matter what else happens.

“That’s why the man who recently won Inc. magazine’s Entrepreneur of the Year, Esquire’s Most Influential People award, Smithsonian’s American Ingenuity Award and Fortune’s Businessman of the Year is ‘all in’ on this new fuel.

“And why he’s buying every tablespoon of White Oil he can get his hands on, to power the new car engines he plans to make in that giant research laboratory he’s building out in the desert.”

That’s Elon Musk, of course, and he genuinely is a true believer in the power of lithium ion batteries to revolutionize energy infrastructure… and that “giant research laboratory” is the huge Gigafactory that Tesla is building in partnership with Panasonic.

And he continues to make the same spurious argument about white oil being cleaner and more efficient than “black oil”…

“Remember, White Oil is already more than 2,000 times more efficient than black oil — because you can drive your car 229 miles on just one tablespoon. (That would take you more than nine gallons of regular oil.)

“And White Oil is more than three times as clean as black oil, too. So you can forget about any hand-wringing from environmentalists. This is the real deal. The knockout punch. Goodbye Putin, goodbye Saudi royal family, hello American energy dominance for the next century and beyond.

“But even so, those scientists are working around the clock to increase the power of White Oil even further. They even announced in August that they’d just doubled it (again).”

Lithium isn’t a source of energy or potential energy, though it can be used to store energy as part of a battery, and the energy density of lithium relative to its weight is a prime reason it’s used in batteries. “Black oil” is a store of energy itself — you extract it from the earth, and all you have to do is burn it to get the potential energy out of the oil. “White oil” is part of a storage battery — it doesn’t come with energy, you have to add that, so you add it by putting electricity into the battery… and a certain amount of that electricity, depending on the efficiency of the battery, can then be extracted to run the electric motors that make your Tesla move. Then it’s out of energy, and you recharge it again by plugging it in to add more energy… depending on where you are and where your electricity comes from, that electricity could be created in the first place by burning natural gas, or burning coal, or from nuclear reactors or solar panels or windmills or other sources. I don’t know where Basenese gets his image of using “a couple tablespoons” of lithium to drive a few hundred miles.

There are other battery chemistries and technologies, of course, but lithium has been in use for a long time, is very light and relatively inexpensive (even after recent price spikes, lithium is still priced by the tonne… it doesn’t create enough of a per-unit cost to have a meaningful impact on phone or car prices, and it might be that nickel, graphite, cobalt or other major components of those batteries have as much of an impact on price as lithium), and works well in batteries, and the challenges created by the flammable nature of those batteries can apparently be pretty well managed by auto designers (though fears always crop up when Samsung phones or Dell laptops start catching fire), so lithium ion batteries seem to still be the “go to” battery chemistry. That might change in the future, I don’t really know.

I’ve probably harped on this before, but it is important to note for those of us who are used to “rare” minerals or the difficulty of finding big new gold deposits and the like… although we may see spurts of demand from the Gigafactory and electric cars, and price spikes to help absorb that demand, there is plenty of lithium in the world, and we shouldn’t see long-lived prices in the “crazy” range — though prices can certainly fluctuate wildly, in part because it takes at least several years to add meaningful new capacity using the current techniques (it takes time for that water to evaporate).

Even if you just count the current mineable reserves we know about and could produce economically at prices well below today’s price, there are decades of reserves — as a rep from Tesla was quoted in a greentech media article last year, “There are more than enough reserves of lithium world-wide to serve the growth of the battery markets, including Tesla’s projected needs. Even if we wanted to build 10 or 20 Gigafactories, we would not have to search beyond the known reserves that can be economically mined.” (That article actually made the point that nickel and cobalt are of more concern when it comes to a secure supply for batteries — but that’s largely a political/security question, not a matter of those metals having a lack of available in-the-ground reserves).

Which means, to me, that I’d be pretty confident about the future of companies that have meaningful production capacity, or feasible projects that you’re pretty sure can be built and profitable at current lithium prices (or lower prices), but I wouldn’t go hog-wild over just any company with some staked ground in a salty desert and the word “lithium” in its name. Lithium exploration doesn’t excite me very much, because there’s no shortage of lithium reserves and I don’t see any huge geopolitical issues rising up to make lithium from South America or Australia hard to get, but I can see being tempted by large lithium companies who have meaningful and economical production. That’s why I’ve noted my fondness for Orocobre a few times in the past, because it sits in a bit of a sweet spot as a significant producer but not a diversified global chemicals or fertilizer company, so it will be much more impacted by lithium prices than will Albemarle, FMC, or SQM (or Talison, which is the fourth big player that gets mentioned frequently but which is 49% owned by Albemarle).

I never did buy Orocobre shares, unfortunately, and the price got pretty out of hand this year, but perhaps this pullback on the operational and “scaling up” problems they’ve had will continue and that will get more attractive… otherwise, I’d probably be boring and stick with a stodgier “blue chip” lithium company like Albemarle (ALB), even though it’s pretty pricey at about 20X next year’s earnings.


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misterht01
Member
👍10
misterht01

Why don’t we all Gumshoe members wise up and write Travis in for President? Can become a very serious contender in this political climate and BEGORRAHH….turn the white house into Gumshoedom…

jameshmwebb
Member
👍18
jameshmwebb

Hear hear. Brilliant stuff, Travis. Many thanks.

beckycs
Irregular
👍10
beckycs

Here! Here! I second that notion.

Carbon Bigfoot
Guest
Carbon Bigfoot

“Here we go again” as Reagan said to Carter. Lithium does not fuel Power Plants from which batteries draw their energy. Lithium will never replace oil as it is the Iconic, high energy density, inexpensive fuel or feedstock for 8000 products. The Industry spends $6 Trillion in CAPEX yearly exploring, transporting, refining, marketing and delivering their beneficial, industrial, commercial and residential products 24/7 and 365. That is on top of their current assets in the HUNDREDS OF TRILLIONS of DOLLARS. No windmill, solar panel or pond scum wet dream WILL EVER REPLACE OIL OR IT’S MASSIVE INFRASTRUCTURE ( barring a… Read more »

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jrlartful
Member
👍15
jrlartful

Sorry to burst your bubble (not) but you even manage to misquote your apparent hero, RR, who actually said “There YOU go again”. Your assertions regarding the infinite supply of every dirty fuel imaginable while degrinating the possibilities of clean fuel are similarly dubious.

Carbon Bigfoot
Guest
Carbon Bigfoot

Good for you I misquoted—my bad. I can guarantee you lack the CV to reach your conclusion which is not based on science fact, but environmental religion. NO electrochemistry paradigm provides more than one mile/ lb. of battery mass while gasoline is about 8 mi/ lb. and with a little tweaking internal combustion engines could easily go 12 mi/ lb. of petrol. Jet fuel equal in performance which is why jets fly on carbon fuel and always will. Your other Greenie wet dream Solar Flight took over a year to circle the Globe and not continuous—kumbaya!!

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vladimir pugachev
Guest
vladimir pugachev

Obviously you failed English as well as Chemistry. Not that I want to denigrate your other achievements. Whatever they may be.

SoGiAm
Member
👍11361

Argonne researchers posit way to locally circumvent Second Law of Thermodynamics http://scienmag.com/argonne-researchers-posit-way-to-locally-circumvent-second-law-of-thermodynamics/

jlemay69
Guest
jlemay69

Chemistry of recovery has been precipitation from hot brine since Lithium Carbonate is less soluble in hot water than cold water. Precipitate, filter out and use dryer to recover solids. Spodumene is small percentage Lithium. Chile Andean brine recovery is 1/4 cost of Spodumene mining.

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Judson Ruhl
Guest

Not to sound too picky, but I was confused by where this actually is: There is NO Clayton County in Nevada, it’s actually Clayton Valley in Esmeralda County (Emerald in Spanish) Wherein resides Goldfield– once the huge Gold-rush town and area, now the least(until now) populated place in NV. I had to learn all the counties in Grade School and didn’t remember a Clayton.

exotichunter
Irregular
👍24
exotichunter

Just to make the subject complete, if we were to combine lithium energy storage with Thorium fueled reactors we would have all the energy, water, food, clean air, and a more peaceful earth than one could ever imagine. This is doable if we could just get the politics and military Industrial lobby out of the way. But that’s probably a pipe dream. The US has a 200 year supply of thorium stored in the spent uranium fuel rod pools scattered all over this land. Most likely the Chinese will have this in place long before we get started. Explore Thorium… Read more »

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Just Askin\'
Guest
Just Askin\'

Altho I agree our leaders are dumb, nobody wants a nuclear plant in their neighborhood…agreed?

stormconnors
Member
👍16
stormconnors

My observation is that if anyone wants to build anything, there will be a group formed to oppose it. It doesn’t matter how safe or useful. Cell towers, wind turbines, water bottling plants, power lines, pipelines, power plants; it doesn’t matter what, lawyers for both sides will get rich.

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beckycs
Irregular
👍10
beckycs

Sadly, true.

beckycs
Irregular
👍10
beckycs

I would not mind at all. It’s clean, quiet, inexpensive and the new technology we have today makes it much safer than it used to be.

elton saulsberry
Guest

I’d be happy to have a molten salt reactor (thorium or uranium) next door. MSR’s are nothing like the current crop of light water reactors you’re thinking of. The technology is sufficiently different it really should have a different name.

http://www.transatomicpower.com/

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kevin
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kevin

japan had good reactors and they failed. Plus what are you going to do w/ the spent fuel rods and control rods. They spent billion out west for a stable storage location and after it was done they said no way, so now all the rods are sitting in water cooling tanks and after awhile they are stored in cement block, that line interstate 95 near DC, I live there and you see them a few hundred feet away. They even gave rad meds to a number of people b/c of problems.

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Gene
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Gene

My uncle is a (just retired) nuclear physicist. In the years leading up to retirement, he inspected the US’s nuclear power plants. While he didn’t visit Fukushima after the disaster, he was not complimentary of their lax practices and inadequate preparations.
Fukushima was not a “good” operation.

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Mad Lode
Guest
Mad Lode

Ahem….Japan had reactors based on the ones we created over 60 years go….so yes they failed since the buildings were not designed to take on a tsunami and a level 10 earth quake back to back.

rush
Guest
rush

Thorium in a molten salt reactor is something entirely different from Fukishima. MSRs cant melt down, they need no containment etc etc…you are comparing apples to bowling balls.

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Allen
Guest
Allen

Kevin you saw him talk about the weapons producing reactors vs thorium ones. Look them up, come to understand what’s up with em.

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Thomas Maynard
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Thomas Maynard

I love Nuclear Plants. Worked them for 47 years. I’ll take one right now to lower the damn rates here in Western North Carolina.

kevin
Guest
kevin

So I’ll be rich, and have all I want and the drug and gang problems will end, territory claims w/ no long be an issue, and everyone has money and happy. Well, those how make money from oil (mid east, russia, mexico and so on) how will this make them happy, or rather how this not make them upset and want more which leads to war, also, religion and race problem will be over as well as poverty. Let us not forget terrorist, they blow one up and fall out city. That aside, how does a nuclear reactor make food???… Read more »

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Allen
Guest
Allen

Kevin you’re simply not even paying attention to what you’re talking about.
There’s something called a molten salt reactor. It’s not for making weapons.
The current kind in use worldwide are all designed specifically to make dangerous radiation products: weapons.

lc_fort
Irregular
👍9
lc_fort

Any opininion about Nemaska Lithium ( Inc.http://www.nemaskalithium.com/en/) ?

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funu50401
Member
👍2

Way to go Travis, although I’ve been interested in Lithium for many years and for a like time period have owned a few SQM shares; now, finally, I’ve found someone to give me the non-hyped dope on lithium.
Thanks a bunch.

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koifish46
Member
👍20
koifish46

A better bet would be to invest in Panasonic (PCRFY), the other big partner with Tesla in the gigafactory being built.

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beckycs
Irregular
👍10
beckycs

Wow! I had no idea that Panasonic is an OTC stock.

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Francisco
Member
👍2

Could the future of batteries be aluminium rather than lithium?

http://news.stanford.edu/2015/04/06/aluminum-ion-battery-033115/

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RPaul
Guest
RPaul

A very good alternative. Also, do not overlook very recent research with magnesium-since batteries that has overcome the builds ups that currently hamper recharge ability.

RPaul
Guest
RPaul

I apologize for the typo. It should read magnesium-ZINC

BurnsS
Guest
BurnsS

Check out this new operation for Liquid Metal Batteries – they provide better alternatives in terms of grid storage.http://www.ambri.com/ , pretty neat stuff.

jrlartful
Member
👍15
jrlartful

The trouble with aluminum is that the process of extracting it from its ore is extremely energy intensive so much so that it is traditionally done by on site generation of electricity from coal, the grid is not trusted with the job.

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Bud
Guest
Bud

The source of energy that could fill the electric grid and therefore charge lithium batteries is geothermal energy as proposed by Billions In Change. That will lead to advances in companies making the equipment to send water down to the magnum layer and deliver steam back. Unfortunately, BillionsInChange is an privately held LLC company in Michigan. You can find their videos on YouTube,

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Carbon Bigfoot
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Carbon Bigfoot

Another Greenie wet dream. You and others need a dose of Energy Reality in a 20 minute video on youtube provided by Mark Mills at the ICCC-10, climate/energy conference in DC in June 2015 which I was privileged to attend. I would provide a link but the website won’t allow.
Just Browser it.

SoGiAm
Member
👍11361

Notice several new Irregulars on this thread and provide this link to peak under the hood of what stockgumshoe.com has to offer: http://www.stockgumshoe.com/2014/11/first-steps-and-favorite-tools-for-new-investors/ Welcome! Thanks Travis and Gummunity.
Best2all ~ Ben

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RPaul
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RPaul

Why does all the touting of lithium remind me of the “only recently passed” Rare Earth endeavors? Maybe because I am reading the same stories about the same types of companies? G-Sachs most recent tout is what has put me over the line I guess. Inasmuch as they tout to either balance their own book or offload directional errors, I am quite skeptic. In the explorational miners mind you. As Travis, and others have indicated, one cannot get so caught up in the stories that they forget the basics. CAPEX for most, if not all, of these small companies will… Read more »

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David B.
Member
👍853
David B.

Lou B is very high on my biggest holding $CLIR as well. ClearSign Combustion just had very significant news today–confirmed Best Available Control Technology in taking an old mothballed (for 30 years for being too polluting) into one of the cleanest refinery heaters in all of California. For those who know about low NOx and low CO this is truly remarkable news. I see $CLIR going above $10 within three months (from start of today $5.40).

David B.
Member
👍853
David B.

Here is a link to today’s $CLIR news ($CLIR is a Lou B favorite)
http://ir.clearsign.com/2016-10-24-ClearSign-Announces-Successful-Completion-of-Tricor-Refinery-Heater-Project

gchapel
Member
👍3
gchapel

Thank you!! EVERYBODY is preaching “White Oil” right now, but this is the first clear, complete analysis I have yet to see. Thanks for clearing the fog and giving some common sense advice. I love this site!

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PRuss
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PRuss

Sounds like something the bulls leave in the fields to me. Maybe it ain’t bullshit but it ain’t fact either.

gary nettenstrom
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gary nettenstrom

There is no county in Nevada named Clayton

Lance Sjogren
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Lance Sjogren

Black oil matters!

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j w
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j w

I think this may be pertinent to the discussion. The guy who invented Lithium batteries has just invented a new and better battery. I love the fact that he’s 94 years old.