“Photon Beam Technology Kills Cancer in 16 Minutes”

By Travis Johnson, Stock Gumshoe, April 24, 2009

This ad has been crashing in on Gumshoe beach in massive waves over the last week, so I thought it might be time to take a gander. It’s for the Xcelerated Profits report at Mt. Vernon Research — the last time I saw a similar ad it was from Karim Rahemtulla for this same report, but it seems that we now have Marc Lichtenfeld to thank for this ad.

It’s all about a cancer killer, which, as most folks who dabble in biotech will tell you, is where a lot of the money is — blockbusters like Genentech’s Avastin and revolutionary devices like Intuitive Surgical’s da Vinci robot are huge moneymakers because of their ability to help fight cancer in one way or another.

The ad does really get your attention, because there are copious quotes from both patients and doctors — stories of patients who had treatments that took just minutes, or a few hours, and saw tremendous results, and endorsements from a variety of oncologists. So it seems real.

And it is a real, accepted product — just to “tease” you a bit myself (and I also own shares of this one). Here’s a bit more about the company, just to get your mouth watering …

“Now, as Americans seek alternatives to traditional cancer treatment – others like Bruce [Jenkins — he was one of the patients teased at the top of the ad] are discovering this amazing cancer blaster.

“It’s not surgery… It’s not chemotherapy… It’s not a drug…

“It’s a breakthrough treatment that the FDA has approved to destroy cancer anywhere on the body… and it can even blast away tumors that were once considered inoperable.

“But here’s the exciting part…

“So far, this technology has remained in limited use. Chances are, your own doctor hasn’t had access.

“But finally, the company behind the device has introduced an improvement that promises to make this technology absolutely essential to every single cancer-treatment center in the world.

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“Just days ago, in fact, hundreds of doctors from around the world convened at a medical conference in South Florida – just to get a closer look at this life-saving device.

“Even the most skeptical among them were calling it ‘groundbreaking.’ Dr. Henry Jacobs – Head of Oncology at a major Oklahoma hospital – said this cancer blaster “exceeded my highest expectations.”

“You see, the perfected version of the technology can actually destroy cancer cells in as little as 16 minutes flat. And quietly, behind the scenes, this technology is about to go ‘mainstream.'”

OK, so that 16 minutes is actually a time that they claimed for treatment of the first brain cancer patient by this device in Tulsa, Oklahoma last Summer (you can see that press release here).

And I won’t leave you hanging any further — this cancer-fighting machine is the Cyberknife, and it’s made and sold by Accuray, the company being teased here.

That medical conference in South Florida, by the way, was the Cyberknife Users Meeting in Hollywood, FL — here’s the company’s press release about the meeting.

Accuray has gotten a fair amount of attention from investors and from investment newsletters, in part because of the spectacular success of the “kind of similar” robotic medicine company Intuitive Surgical. I’ve owned shares of both companies in the past, but currently hold only Accuray shares, and at a signficant loss. Intuitive Surgical makes the da Vinci, which is a surgical robot that allows for minimally invasive, more precise (many argue) laparascopic-like surgery through small incisions. Accuray makes the CyberKnife, which is a robotically-controlled radiation machine that offers extremely precise, motion-tracking radiation treatment for various tumors.

One of the major links between the two companies, aside from the fact that they’re both makers of medical robots, broadly defined, is that prostate cancer, the biggest market for da Vinci surgeries, is also a possible huge market for CyberKnife radiosurgery, so they may end up being in direct competition.

CyberKnife is primarily used for a few different cancers right now, particularly those where the surrounding tissue is very sensitive or where surgery is either very risky or impossible — their big markets so far seem to be prostate cancer, brain cancer, and lung cancer. And while brain tumors have been a traditional target of what they call radiosurgery (very precise application of radiation), that was in part because brain tumors don’t move as much as others, and the skull can be immobilized nicely to make sure the aim of the devise is precise enough. The CyberKnife’s claim to fame is that it doesn’t need the tumor to be immobilized, it targets the tumor extremely precisely and uses a robotic arm to follow the movement of the tumor and make sure the right dosage is applied at the right place. That’s part of what seems to make it appealing for lung cancer, for example, since if you keep the lungs from moving for too long the cancer becomes a moot point.

And they compete not just with chemotherapy and other treatments, and with surgery (whether robotic or traditional), but also with other radiation-delivery devices. There are several companies offering innovation in radiosurgery (including Varian Medical, to name one publicly traded competitor), though they may or may not be as promising — and it does appear that the CyberKnife, at least according to the company, is by far the most widely used radiosurgery device, at least for extracranial tumors (that is, any tumors except those in the brain). Clearly there’s huge potential for better treatments in lung cancer and prostate cancer, since those are very high volume cancers that affect huge numbers of people, so if this treatment catches on as “mainstream” perhaps it will bring big bucks for Accuray.

But as I’ve said, I own shares in this one and I’m probably quite biased — it’s not a sure thing, as could be clearly shown by a look at the stock chart (steadily down from $30 or so when they made their IPO two years ago to the current price around $5). And the newsletters have touted it just as breathlessly as they do today in the $20s and in the teens, so there may not be any rush or any magic to the current price point. I’m no expert on the clinical development of the CyberKnife, though it appears that it’s still gaining usage in various different cancers, but one of the main problems with the machine, during these extremely trying financial times, is its massive cost. Even the da Vinci is selling at a bit less volume than we might expect thanks to fact that some hospitals aren’t able to raise the money to buy these showpiece machines, and the CyberKnife is much less mainstream (so far) and several times more expensive.

Analysts keep predicting that the company is on the verge of selling enough systems to become steadily profitable, and the company has been unable to break over that level of sales just yet — they are consistently on the verge of profitability, earning a couple cents or losing a couple cents each quarter, and they have plenty of cash still left from their IPO and no long term debt, so they don’t seem to be in any kind of distress … but they do certainly need to ramp up sales in the coming years. The expectation is that once they’re able to push sales a a bit higher, their profitability could grow very quickly as the big fixed costs of designing and manufacturing these expensive machines are absorbed by a bigger sales number. Currently the forward PE ratio is at about 31, and analysts expect the company to grow at least 30% a year … but with lumpy sales figures that could easily be pushed way up or down by just a few CyberKnife sales it’s notoriously difficult to make those estimates — a year and a half ago they were predicting forward earnings of 60 cents and a forward PE of 20, but the 60 cents didn’t appear as scheduled.

So … I still like the long term potential and am willing to leave my bet laying on the table for this speculative stock, but I have no idea what’s going to happen in the coming months, or if the current price represents a bargain. They currently have a big backlog of orders, close to $600 million, and only about 25% of that backlog represents “contingent” orders (which, as I understand it, means something like “the buyer has to raise the money first”) — and about half of that backlog represents potential recurring, high margin services (training, maintenance, attachments, etc.), and the installed base of systems — which is the real key to underlying growth and future profitability — does continue to grow, though growth has tailed off slightly in recent quarters. There are about 150 CyberKnife systems currently in use around the world.

Do your own research on this one of course, as always — and let us know what you think.

Oh, and if you’ve ever subscribed to one of the Mt. Vernon newsletters, including Xcelerated Profits Report, click here to share your opinion on the reviews site. Thanks!\


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jon lorenstockcrazy10Inez D. Emilia AltarTlkngstkLaurel OBrien Recent comment authors

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destry
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destry

Actually….I don’t think this tease is intended to be Accuray…

I believe it’s intended company is:

Varian Medical Systems (VAR)

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stockcrazy10
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stockcrazy10

I think Varian is a few steps behind Accuray in proton therapy technology.

Varian’s website has this disclaimer:

“The proton therapy device technology described here has not been cleared by the US Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) for clinical use and is in development.”

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Lilli Bollinger
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Lilli Bollinger

I also lost a lot of money on Aray. But that is not why I am writing this. It is, however a question for anyone out there. I am looking for some help for the nausea related to kemo. If anyone can help please answer here. Thank you very much.

Lillian Butler
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Lillian Butler

Unfortunately, I have lost a sister and a brother to cancer; one prostrate and the other breast. I’m 88 years old and still scared of the word cancer. Online, one agency guarantees Hydrogen Peroxide, 35% (which is Oxygen) as a cure for cancer and many other diseases. It’s not FDA approved, as the company feels that this would be a slap to the big drug companies, financially, thus may resort to underating the Oxygen. Man cannot live without Oxygen. Many hospitals are currently using it in isolated labs to heal body sores.

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JACK KENDLE
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JACK KENDLE

I understand Patrick Swayze opted for the Cyberknife treatment and it certainly seemed to fail him.

The cost of the treatment is about USD$100,000. In Malaysia the Cyberknife treatment is about USD$20,000.

Mike
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Mike

ONCY – Cancer vacine for Prostrate Cancer, Head and Neck cancers – Phase III – very promising – check out this video.

http://article.wn.com/view/2010/03/10/Virus_to_tr

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Mike
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Mike

I am sorry – I meant Virus that kills cancer cells. Sorry – long day.
Mikeh

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Diana
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Diana

For those who are always worried about any kind of radiation(even an xray), I would think long and hard, after you dry your eyes when you read this article Jan. 10, 2010 @ investor hub. There is also an article from the New York Times Jan. 10, 2010 ..go to…http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/24/health/24radiat… I don't believe that (VAR)varion medical systems is still doing this same kind of unsafe practice to innocent families. Sorry wasn't enough, but the 'gag' was worse. Diana

hemecity
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hemecity

Cyberknife appears to have merit. However, crowded field (ARAY, gamma knife, Trilogy) in a limited use market. Estimates (Google it under Cyberknife, cost) in '05 were saturation of market at 80-100 centers in USA. Reimbursements declining. All of this not good news for future growth of ARAY. Its still better to take care of your health and lower risk of cancer in the first place.

hemecity

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Laurel OBrien
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Laurel OBrien

I am a nurse..the first thing taught about healing wounds (in my day anyway) was blood circulation and 02. 02 is nothing new..but no profit in it.

Inez D. Emilia Altar
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Inez D. Emilia Altar

Radiation is extremely toxic and actually I believe shortens patient´s life expectancy

jon loren
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jon loren

Thanks to a world-changing Cold War blunder, you have one brief window to bank 180 times your money on their 64¢ shares